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Acupuncturist CV Writing Tip's

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Acupuncturist CV Writing Service

Acupuncturist CV Writing Service

Acupuncturists use an ancient form of traditional Chinese medicine to help relieve their clients’ symptoms. This method involves inserting very fine stainless steel needles into key pressure points on the body. The aim is to stimulate these pressure points to regulate the body’s healing process and restore health and energy.

If you are interested in ancient healthcare systems and want to help people, this job could be ideal for you.

To become an acupuncturist, you will need to have good communication and listening skills. The job requires good coordination and a steady hand.

To work safely and effectively with clients, you will need to take an in-depth training course. This usually takes around three years full-time or the part-time equivalent.

The work

As an acupuncturist, your day-to-day work would include:

  • taking a detailed history from clients
  • talking about issues surrounding their symptoms, such as lifestyle, diet and emotions
  • diagnosing and deciding what action to take
  • selecting specific points on the body to be treated
  • inserting needles according to the level of stimulation required
  • keeping records of treatment given to each patient.

Your clients could include those with conditions ranging from arthritis, circulatory problems and high blood pressure to migraine, depression and addiction.

As well as inserting needles, you may also use methods such as moxibustion (burning a dried herb above an acupuncture point), cupping (using a vacuum cup on acupuncture points) and electro-acupuncture (electrical energy to treat parts of the body).


Hours

You are likely to make your own appointments and set your own working hours. However, to meet the needs of clients, you may need to work during some weekends and evenings, and have a flexible approach to your hours.

You would be based in a health clinic or another therapeutic environment. You might also travel to clients’ homes or want to set up your own practice, working from your own premises.


Income

Acupuncturists working full-time may earn between £18,000 and £35,000 a year. Clients are usually charged per consultation or treatment, and the amount charged will often depend on the location. However, as most acupuncturists are self-employed, incomes vary considerably.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

To work safely and effectively with clients, you will need to take an in-depth training course. This usually takes around three years full-time or the part-time equivalent.

Acupuncture is currently an unregulated profession in the UK, however you could work towards membership of a professional body, such as the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) or the Acupuncture Society. These require their members to have achieved certain qualifications and comply with codes of practice. See the following websites for more information.

The British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB) is an independent accreditation body, and has approved several courses that lead to membership of the BAcC. To do a BAAB-approved course you will usually need at least five GCSEs (A-C), including a science subject, and two A levels. Mature students may be considered on the basis of their work experience. Check with course providers (listed on the BAAB and the BAcC websites) for exact entry details as other qualifications may also be accepted. Some colleges will only accept candidates under 21 in exceptional circumstances.

If you are a qualified healthcare professional you may be exempt from certain parts of the training or examinations. Check the British Medical Acupuncture Society (BMAS) website for more information. Members of the BMAS are regulated healthcare professionals who practise acupuncture within their professional practice.

It would be helpful to have a driving licence as you may carry out treatments at several locations, including clients’ homes.

Voluntary Self-Regulation

Organisations from a variety of complementary therapies, including acupuncture, have created a single voluntary regulatory body, known as the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). The aim of the CNHC is to protect the public by registering practitioners, setting standards for safe practice and managing complaints.

Work is currently ongoing to register acupuncturists.

Statutory Regulation

A Department of Health Steering Group has recommended the statutory regulation of practitioners of acupuncture by the Health Professions Council (HPC).


Training and development

Once you are on a course leading to membership of a professional body, you will combine practical work placements with studies at university or college. You will study areas such as:

  • anatomy and physiology
  • common diseases
  • diagnostic skills and methods
  • acupuncture points, life energy (chi or qi) and health
  • acupuncture techniques and treatment
  • emergency first aid
  • business skills and setting up a practice.

Throughout your career you will need to keep your skills and knowledge up to date. You could achieve this through membership of a professional body (like the BAcC or the Acupuncture Society), which would give you access to a programme of continuing professional development (CPD).

You could also take courses in specific acupuncture techniques, advanced theory, and additional complementary practices like herbal medicine, or you could focus on treating specific client groups, such as children or cancer sufferers. Some courses are available at postgraduate and doctoral level.


Skills and knowledge

To become an acupuncturist, you will need to have:

  • a keen interest in biological sciences and complementary therapies
  • the ability to empathise with your clients
  • good communication and listening skills
  • a logical approach to solving problems
  • self awareness and emotional stability
  • the ability to create good working relationships with a range of clients
  • an understanding of the importance of health and safety
  • an ability to work in a precise manner, with good coordination and a steady hand
  • awareness of when to refer the client to another medical practitioner
  • commercial awareness – to develop and run a business.

Opportunities

Acupuncture is becoming increasingly popular in the UK, and there are now over 3000 acupuncturists registered with the BAcC.

You will find most opportunities as a self-employed acupuncturist, working from home or other premises, or within a complementary or holistic therapy centre.

Occasionally you may find work (often part-time) in the NHS, working with specialist nurses and physiotherapists to provide pain management services to patients. However, it is more likely that you would be self-employed and provide some services to the NHS. You should contact GP surgeries, Primary Care organisations and hospitals in your area to promote your services and discuss your options.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The health sector is represented by Skills for Health Sector Skills Council, which comprises three sub‐sectors:

  • National Health Service (NHS)
  • Independent Healthcare Sector (such as private and charitable healthcare providers)
  • Third Sector (healthcare) (such as small local community and voluntary groups, registered charities, foundations, trusts, social enterprises and co‐operatives)

The health sector is made up of hospitals, doctors’ surgeries, dental practices, the ambulance service, nursing homes, residential care homes, complementary medicine and a huge range of other health related activities, from sight tests in opticians to research in medical laboratories. Most people in the health sector work in the publicly funded National Health Service (NHS), which includes:

  • primary care (organisations which the public goes to first) – Doctors/General Practitioners (GPs), NHS Walk in Centres, NHS Direct, Out of Hours Emergency Care
  • secondary care (organisations which the public are referred onto) – Ambulance Trusts, NHS Trusts/hospitals, NHS Foundation Trusts/hospitals, Mental Health Trusts, Care Trusts (provide joint health and social care activities)

NHS policy in England is directed from the centre by the Department of Health. Local organisations, known as Primary Care Trusts (PCTs), are in charge of providing and commissioning services, controlling the majority of the budget. PCTs are overseen by 10 regional organisations called Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs).

The independent sector includes companies and charities that offer hospital and specialist services usually after referral from a doctor. Operations and other work are carried out in private hospitals, independent treatment centres, mental health units and hospices.

Key facts:

  • The health sector is the largest employer in the UK, representing 5.5% of the working age population of the UK and 7.3% of the working age population that are currently in employment.
  • It is estimated that the sector employs over 2 million people, including:
    • over 1.5 million people in the NHS (72%)
    • over 0.5 million people in the Independent Healthcare sector (26%)
    • almost 40,000 in the voluntary sector (2%)
  • 56% of the workforce has a higher education qualification (or equivalent).
  • The age profile for the sector shows an older than average workforce, which is due in part to the fact that it takes some professions a long time to train and can mean that people enter the sector later.

There is a varied list of jobs in the sector ranging from a diverse number of clinical roles, to support and infrastructure staff, for instance: Allied Health Professionals (AHPs); Ambulance Staff; Dental Staff; Doctors/Medical staff; Nursing staff; Midwifery Staff; Healthcare Scientists; Health Informatics Staff; Management; Wider Healthcare Team; Complementary Therapists.


National and regional data

High proportions of the health sector workforce are located in:

  • London
  • South East
  • North West

East Midlands

  • The health sector employs 131,515 people, which accounts for 7% of all employment in the region.
  • The East Midlands employs 8% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 29% of all employment across the sector or 41,200 employees.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 133,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

East of England

  • The health sector employs 164,720 people, which accounts for 7% of all employment in the region.
  • The East of England employs 9.8 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 30% of all employment across the sector or 52,300 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 14% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 103,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

London

  • The health sector employs over 249,524 people, which accounts for 6% of all the employment in the region.
  • London employs 15% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 33% of all employment across the sector or 78,500 employees.
  • Vacancies in health and social work account for 12% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 146,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

North East

  • The health sector employs 89,201 people, which accounts for 8.7% of all employment in the region.
  • The North East employs 5.3 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 25% of all employment across the sector or 23,800 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 12% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be almost 46,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

North West

  • The health sector employs 251,960 people, which accounts for 8% of all employment in the region.
  • The North West employs 15% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 23.5% of all employment across the sector or 59,200 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work account for 11% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 133,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

South East

  • The health sector employs 264,071 people, which accounts for 7.1% of all employment in the region.
  • The South East employs 15.7% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 23.5% of all employment across the sector or 59,200 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 12% of all Industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 164,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

South West

  • The health sector employs 182,187 people, which accounts for 8.2% of all employment in the region.
  • The South West employs 10.8 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 30% of all employment across the sector or 60,700 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 12% of all Industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 105,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

West Midlands

  • The health sector employs 168,746 people, which accounts for 7.2% of all employment in the region.
  • The West Midlands employs 10% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 25% of all employment across the sector or 43,000 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 9% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 108,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

Yorkshire and the Humber

  • The health sector employs 182,848 people, which accounts for 8.2% of all employment in the region.
  • Yorkshire and the Humber employ 10.9 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 24% of the total health care workforce or 42,000 employees.
  • Vacancies in health and social work account for 11% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 97,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

Northern Ireland

  • The health sector employs 61,300 people.
  • Northern Ireland employs 3% of the total health sector workforce.
  • 81% of the workforce is female.
  • 26% of the workforce is aged 35‐44 years.
  • 96% of the workforce is white.
  • 10% of the workforce reports a disability.
  • 48% of the workforce is in Associate Professional and Technical occupations.
  • 23% of organisations in the health and social work sector report vacancies.

Scotland

  • The health sector employs 201,500 people.
  • Scotland employs 10% of the total health sector workforce.
  • 78% of the workforce is female.
  • 30% of the workforce is aged 45‐54 years.
  • 95% of the workforce is white.
  • 14% of the workforce reports a disability.
  • 39% of the workforce is in Associate Professional and Technical occupations.
  • 23% of organisations in the health and social work sector report vacancies.

Wales

  • The health sector employs 114,900 people.
  • Wales employs 6% of the total health sector workforce.
  • 74% of the workforce is female.
  • 34% of the workforce is aged 45‐54 years.
  • 94% of the workforce is white.
  • 18% of the workforce reports a disability.
  • 40% of the workforce is in Associate Professional and Technical occupations.
  • 27% of organisations in the health and social work sector report vacancies.

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