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Advertising Media Planner CV Writing Tip's

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Advertising Media Planner CV Writing Service

Advertising Media Planner CV Writing Service

As a media planner, it would be your job to make sure that advertising campaigns are seen by as many people as possible. You would decide the best ways of reaching your target audience. You would use media like television, radio, press advertising, posters and the internet.

To become a media planner you will need good spoken and written communication skills. You’ll need to be good at presenting. Good ‘people’ skills are also important.

Usually, employers will be mainly interested in your personal qualities rather than your formal qualifications.

The work

Your job could include:

  • meeting with the client and an account executive to understand the client’s advertising needs
  • researching the target audience’s TV viewing and reading habits, and lifestyles
  • using media monitoring organisations such as the Radio Joint Audio Research (RAJAR) and Broadcasters’ Audience Research Board (BARB)
  • planning the best times and places to show advertisements
  • presenting plans and costings to clients
  • working closely with creative teams, researchers and other members of the advertising team
  • working with a media buyer to cost and book advertising space
  • building relationships with the media.

You would normally work on several accounts at the same time. In smaller agencies, your job may be combined with media buying.


Hours

Your hours could vary – you would usually work Monday to Friday, but your days would often be longer than 9am to 5pm when there are deadlines to meet.

You would be office-based, but may travel to meet clients and media owners.


Income

Starting salaries can be between £18,000 and £22,000 a year. With experience this can rise to £25,000 to £45,000. Senior planners can earn £60,000 or more.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

Usually, employers will be mainly interested in your personal qualities, such as creativity, quick thinking and business sense, rather than your formal qualifications.

Advertising is a very competitive industry to enter, and you may have an advantage if you have a BTEC HND or degree in one of the following subjects:

  • advertising
  • marketing
  • statistics or operational research
  • communication and media studies
  • business or management
  • psychology.

In smaller advertising agencies you could start in a more junior position, such as administrator, and work your way up as your experience of the industry develops.

Whatever your background, you will need to show agencies that you are genuinely interested in media in all its forms.

It’s a good idea to get work experience in an advertising agency before looking for your first job. You could contact agencies directly to ask about placements, and make industry contacts through relevant groups on social networking sites.

Any previous work experience in media, marketing, communications or sales would also be useful.


Training and development

You will usually start as a junior media planner and develop your skills at work, perhaps as part of an agency’s structured graduate training scheme. Your training would typically cover marketing techniques, interpreting audience research, report writing and communication skills.

You may also be able to work towards qualifications from the professional associations, such as:

  • IPA Foundation Certificate – an online course for junior staff with at least six months’ experience in any area of advertising
  • IPA Advanced Certificate – a more advanced 10-month online course
  • IPA Excellence Diploma – for people with at least three years’ experience
  • Communication Advertising and Marketing Education Foundation (CAM) Diploma in Marketing Communications – for this you will need a degree or equivalent, or at least two years’ relevant work experience.

You can also take short courses to help keep your knowledge and skills up to date throughout your career. See the IPA and the Account Planning Group websites for details.


Skills and knowledge

To become an advertising media planner you will need

  • good spoken and written communication skills
  • strong presentation and negotiation skills
  • confidence, tact and persuasiveness
  • the ability to analyse and interpret statistics
  • good computer skills
  • good ‘people skills’, to work well as part of a team and with a range of clients
  • the ability to work under pressure and to deadlines
  • a professional manner
  • an understanding of business and the media.

Opportunities

Advertising is a very popular career choice among graduates, and competition for jobs is strong.

Vacancies appear in the national press, trade publications, the IPA website and through specialist recruitment agencies. However, not all positions are advertised, so you could also approach agencies directly, or find work through making contacts in the industry.

As an established media planner, you could move into account management. Freelance planning work is also possible. With experience and a good track record you could become a senior planner or manager.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The advertising industry is part of the creative industries, represented by Creative Skillset. This includes: advertising; animation; computer games; corporate and commercial production; fashion and textiles; film; interactive media; photo imaging; publishing; radio; and television.

[N.B. The advertising sector has now been brought under Creative Skillset’s remit and they are currently working on a research programme for the industry. They expect to report back with updated LMI information and statistics from early 2011.]

Advertising agencies (creative, media, direct marketing, digital, sponsorship, specialist agencies etcetera) are core to the advertising industry and are firmly positioned within the ‘creative industries’, alongside architecture, design, fashion and computer services. Careers in advertising can be divided into:

  • Creative careers, which include jobs in copywriting and art direction/graphic design.
  • Commercial careers, which involve planning the advertising strategy and an analysis of markets and targets. Media management and market research are the main strands here.

Key facts:

  • There are 21,455 people working in advertising, this number has declined by 19% since 2006.
  • There are 345 businesses, of which 7% employ less than 5 people and 64% employ more than 20 people.
  • Advertising contributes £1.11 billion to the UK economy.
  • 17% of the workforce is self-employed.
  • 17% of the workforce is employed part-time.
  • Women in the industry are generally more highly qualified than men (53% have an above level 4 qualification as their highest qualification compared with 50% of men).
  • Women are likely to earn less money than men (79% of women in advertising earn less than £20,000 per annum, compared to 33% of men).
  • 6% of the workforce has a below Level 2 qualification (GCSE level).
  • Staff turnover in the industry is high.

Jobs in the industry include: Account Manager, Account Planner, Advertising Account Executive, Advertising Account Planner, Advertising Art Director, Advertising Installer, Advertising Media Buyer, Advertising Media Planner, Brand Manager, Copywriter/Art Director, Event and Exhibition Organiser.


National and regional data

Northern Ireland – There are 11,640 people working in the Northern Ireland creative and cultural sector, of which 2% are in advertising. Advertising in Northern Ireland contributes £7 million to the UK economy. More than 99% of the advertising workforce is white and 74% are male. Less than 1% of the advertising workforce is self-employed.

Scotland – There are 45,420 people working in the Scottish creative and cultural sector, of which 1% is in advertising. Advertising in Scotland contributes £36 million to the UK economy. More than 88% of the advertising workforce is white and 32% are female. 30% of the workforce is self-employed.

Wales – There are 24,060 people working in the Welsh creative and cultural sector, of which 2% are in advertising. Advertising in Wales contributes £5.3 million to the UK economy. More than 99% of the advertising workforce is white and 79% are male. 23% of the advertising workforce is self-employed.

[N.B. The data for the following regions are for the creative and cultural sector as a whole.]

East Midlands – There are 44,380 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 7% of the UK sector workforce. There are 3,950 creative businesses in the region, of which 92% employ less than 50 people. 35% of the workforce is self employed. 63% of the workforce is male. 95% of the sector workforce is white and 54% are under 40 years.

East of England – There are 63,700 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 9% of the UK sector workforce. There are 6,710 creative businesses in the region, of which 93% employ less than 50 people. 37% of the workforce is self employed. 66% of the workforce is male. 95% of the sector workforce is white and 46% are under 40 years.

London – There are 164,690 people in the sector workforce in London, representing 24% of the UK sector workforce. There are 21,600 creative businesses, of which 93% employ less than 50 people. 51% of the workforce is self employed. 58% of the workforce is male. 84% of the sector workforce is white and 56% are under 40 years.

North East – There are 19,680 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 3% of the UK sector workforce. There are 1,330 creative businesses in the region, of which 90% employ less than 50 people. 38% of the workforce is self employed. 63% of the workforce is male. 96% of the sector workforce is white and 53% are under 40 years.

North West – There are 59,580 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 9% of the UK sector workforce. There are 5,660 creative businesses in the region, of which 91% employ less than 50 people. 34% of the workforce is self employed; the majority of who are in arts and music. 62% of the workforce is male. 95% of the sector workforce is white and 55% are under 40 years.

South East – There are 98,170 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 14% of the UK sector workforce. There are 12,300 creative businesses in the region, of which 93% employ less than 50 people. 43% of the workforce is self employed. 59% of the workforce is male. 97% of the sector workforce is white and 47% are under 40 years.

South West – There are 60,690 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 9% of the UK sector workforce. There are approximately 5,000 creative businesses in the region, of which 93% employ less than 50 people. 47% of the workforce is self employed in arts, design and music. 59% of the workforce is male. 98% of the sector workforce is white and 46% are under 40 years.

West Midlands – There are 40,300 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 6% of the UK sector workforce. There are approximately 5,000 creative businesses in the region, of which 91% employ less than 50 people. 31% of the workforce is self employed, which is the lowest regional figure. 58% of the workforce is male. 91% of the sector workforce is white and 49% are under 40 years.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are 45,900 people in the sector workforce in the region, representing 7% of the UK sector workforce. There are just under 4,000 creative businesses in the region, of which 90% employ less than 50 people. 40% of the workforce is self employed. 60% of the workforce is male. 97% of the sector workforce is white and 53% are under 40 years.

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