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Aerospace Engineer CV Writing Tip's

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Aerospace Engineer CV Writing Service

Aerospace Engineer CV Writing Service

If you are passionate about aircraft and spacecraft, and want to be involved in their development, this job could be perfect for you.

To become this type of engineer you will need to have excellent maths and IT skills. You will need to be able to use computer aided design or manufacturing software. You will also need good technical knowledge.

To do this job you will normally need a degree, BTEC or HND in a relevant engineering subject.

Aerospace engineers work on the development of aircraft and related technology. Their work covers:

  • fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters
  • space vehicles
  • missiles and weapons
  • flight simulators
  • flight components and instruments.

As an aerospace engineer, you could work in research and development, testing or production and maintenance. Your duties would vary depending on which area you worked in, but may include:

  • developing avionic systems like navigation instruments and communications
  • researching ways to make fuel-efficient parts, such as wings, fuselage and engines
  • using computer-aided design (CAD) software to draw up project designs
  • carrying out ground- and flight-testing programmes on prototypes
  • collecting and analysing test data
  • planning and supervising the assembly and fitting of aircraft and components
  • signing off projects under strict licensing regulations
  • scheduling and supervising line (airport) and base (hangar) maintenance of aircraft.

You would also be involved with estimating project costs and timescales, attending meetings, writing technical reports and manuals, and giving presentations to managers and clients.

With several years’ experience as an engineer, you could work on the investigation of air accidents.

Hours

You would work 37 to 40 hours a week, but longer hours may sometimes be needed, depending on the project and deadlines.

You would work in offices and factory production hangars, and may have to travel to inspect or test aircraft at different sites.

Income

Starting salaries can be between £20,000 and £25,000 a year.

Experienced aerospace engineers can earn between £28,000 and £40,000. Salaries for senior staff, such as project leaders can range from £45,000 to £65,000.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.

Entry requirements

You will normally need a foundation degree, BTEC HNC/HND or degree in aeronautical or aerospace engineering, avionics or air transport engineering. However, employers may also accept other subjects such as:

  • electrical or electronic engineering
  • mechanical engineering
  • manufacturing or product engineering
  • physics and applied physics
  • software engineering
  • maths.

Skills and knowledge

To become an aerospace engineer, you will need to have:

  • strong problem-solving skills
  • excellent maths and IT skills
  • knowledge of computer aided design (CAD) or manufacturing (CAM) software
  • good communication skills
  • excellent technical knowledge
  • the ability to plan, prioritise and manage projects effectively
  • the ability to work within budgets
  • a commitment to keeping up to date with new developments
  • a comprehensive understanding of engineering licence regulations.

Having European language skills may be helpful to you, particularly if you are working on a joint international project.

Industry summary

The transport equipment manufacturing industry is part of the engineering manufacturing, science and mathematics sector, represented by Semta Sector Skills Council. This sector also includes the following industries: automotive manufacture; electronics and electrical equipment manufacture; mechanical equipment manufacture; metals; and science. Across the sector as a whole, the workforce comprises approximately 2 million people, working across around 75,000 companies. UK engineering and science turnover is over £250 billion. British engineering exports amount to 37% of total UK exports of goods and services. The UK is Europe’s top location for investment in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research and development.

The UK transport equipment manufacturing industry comprises:

  • Aerospace – covers the manufacture of a range of aircraft and spacecraft (such as satellites), as well as the manufacture of essential mechanical and electrical components (such as rotors on helicopters, avionics/aircraft electrical systems and jet engines). It also includes companies that employ people to maintain, repair and overhaul aircraft.
  • Marine – covers companies that employ people involved in designing, developing, building and maintaining large cargo ships, ferries, warships, and fishing boats. Companies that construct floating and submersible drilling platforms, barges and floating docks are also included.
  • Other transport – covers a smaller number of employers that employ people to manufacture railway and tramway locomotives and rolling stock, motorcycles and bicycles and invalid carriages.

Key facts:

  • Aerospace:
    • There are an estimated 96,800 people employed in the industry, across 720 companies in Great Britain.
    • The greatest concentrations of employment in the aerospace industry are in the North West, South West and East Midlands.
    • 97% of the workforce is full‐time.
  • Marine:
    • There are an estimated 33,600 people employed in the industry, across nearly 1,620 companies in Great Britain.
    • The greatest concentrations of employment in the marine industry are in the South West, Scotland and the North West and South East of England.
    • Boatbuilding and leisure marine equipment manufacture is a growth sector in the UK.
    • Some powerboat builders export more than 90% of production.
    • 96% of the workforce is full‐time.
  • Other transport:
    • There are an estimated 14,800 people employed in the industry, across nearly 600 companies in Great Britain.
    • The greatest concentrations of employment in the other transport are in the East Midlands and West Midlands.
    • 95% of the workforce is full‐time.

Jobs in the industry range from: aerospace engineer, design engineer, marine engineer, mechanical engineer, naval architect, laboratory technician, manufacturing production manager, quality control inspector, marine craftsperson, sheet metal worker, welder, shipwright/riveter/plater, labourers in process and plant operations.

National and regional data

East Midlands – There are an estimated 20,200 employees in the regional workforce, in around 240 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (14,900) and the second largest was other transport (3,700). There is a total requirement of 2,690 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Statistical Process Control (SPC). The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment, aerospace and automotive. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Derby City, Leicester City, South Derbyshire, Charnwood, Hinckley and Bosworth and Ashfield.

East of England – There are an estimated 8,200 employees in the regional workforce, in 360 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (6,400) and the second largest was marine (1,400). There is a total requirement of 2,740 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Material Requirement Planning (MRP11); tool setting; mechanical engineering; and carpentry/woodwork. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Peterborough, Huntingdonshire, South Cambridgeshire, Luton and Basildon.

London – There are an estimated 2,700 employees in the regional workforce, in 140 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in other transport manufacture (1,400) and the second largest was aerospace (1,200). There is a total requirement of 465 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Barking and Dagenham, Hillingdon, Ealing and Hounslow.

North East – There are an estimated 1,100 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 40 companies. The largest group of employees are employed in marine companies (1,100). There is a total requirement of 850 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: assembly line/production robotics; and metal workers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Sunderland and Sedgefield.

North West – There are an estimated 28,500 employees in the regional workforce, in 260 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (22,300). There is a total requirement of 4,000 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; welding skills; and fabrication. The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment and aerospace. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Fylde, Knowsley, Crewe and Nantwich, Stockport, Oldham and Preston.

South East – There are an estimated 16,600 employees in the regional workforce, in 640 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (10,600) and the second largest was marine (4,900). There is a total requirement of 2,185 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Computer Aided Engineering (CAE); Computer Aided Design (CAD); Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM); Materials Requirement Planning (MRP); Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); and aircraft engineering. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around West Berkshire, Basingstoke and Deane, Milton Keynes, Eastleigh, Portsmouth, Crawley and Medway.

South West – There are an estimated 30,500 employees in the regional workforce, in 480 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (17,700) and the second largest was marine (11,500). There is a total requirement of 6,530 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; and aircraft engineering. There are above average concentrations of employment in the marine and aerospace industries. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Tewkesbury, Cheltenham, Stroud, South Gloucestershire, Bristol, Swindon, South Somerset, Poole and Plymouth.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 9,300 employees in the regional workforce, in 230 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (5,700) and the second largest was other transport (2,700). There is a total requirement of 1,110 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: multi‐skills. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Birmingham, Sandwell, Walsall, Coventry, Dudley and Telford and Wrekin.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 4,300 employees in the regional workforce, in 170 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (2,600) and the second largest was other transport (1,100). There is a total requirement of 815 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Kirklees, Rotherham and Kingston upon Hull.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 5,400 employees in the workforce. There is a total requirement of 150 employees needed per year between 2005 and 2014. 63% of the workforce is metal plate workers, shipwrights and riveters. Skills gaps include: welding; CNC machine operations; mechanical engineering skills; metalworking; and electrical engineering skills. Northern Ireland has above average concentrations of employment in the aerospace sector.

Scotland – There are an estimated 12,600 employees in the workforce, in just over 200 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in marine manufacture (6,000) and the second largest was aerospace (5,500). There is a total requirement of 2,170 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: assembly line/production robotics; electronics; and mechanical fitters. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around the City of Glasgow, Fife, South Lanarkshire, the City of Aberdeen, North Lanarkshire and West Lothian.

Wales – There are an estimated 11,200 employees in the workforce, in 160 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (9,900) and the second largest was other transport (700). There is a total requirement of 1,470 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: general engineering skills; electronics; and electrical engineering. The largest industries in terms of employment are automotive, basic metals, mechanical equipment and aerospace. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Flintshire, Neath Port Talbot, Newport, Rhondda, Cynon and Taff, Bridgend and Wrexham.

[N.B. Data derived from Annual Business Inquiry, 2007, Census, 2001, and Northern Ireland Census of Employment, 2007.]

 

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