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Aerospace Engineering Technician CV Writing Tip's

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Aerospace Engineering Technician CV Writing Service

Aerospace Engineering Technician CV Writing Service

Aerospace engineering technicians design, build and test new aircraft. They also repair and service existing aircraft. They work on all types of civil and military aircraft, as well as weapons systems and satellites.

To get into this job you will need good practical skills. You’ll need excellent maths, science and IT knowledge. You’ll also have to be good at managing a varied workload.

The best way to start would be by becoming a technician apprentice with an airline operator, airline manufacturer or service engineering company.

As an aerospace engineering technician, you would normally work in one of two areas:

  • mechanics – building and servicing aircraft fuselage, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, such as wings, engines and landing gear
  • avionics – installing and testing electrical and electronic systems used in navigation, communications and flight control.

Your duties in both areas would include:

  • developing component plans using computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM) software
  • investigating and testing solutions to engineering problems caused by weight, altitude, temperature and engine performance
  • building and testing prototypes, using models and computer simulations
  • using prototypes to predict and refine the performance of aircraft systems.

You would also carry out line and base maintenance between flights. Line duties include pre-flight checks, refuelling and minor tasks. Base maintenance involves more stringent checks, fault diagnosis and repairs, and is carried out in an aircraft hangar.


Hours

You would normally work 37 to 40 hours a week; this could vary depending on the project you are working on and any deadlines you need to meet. In some roles, you may be required to work shifts.

If you are involved in development or design, you would work in an office or lab facility. In production or maintenance, you would usually be based in an aircraft hangar.


Income

Trainees can earn between £12,000 and £15,000 a year. Technicians with experience and qualifications can earn between £20,000 and £30,000. Senior technicians may earn £30,000 or more. Bonuses and overtime payments may also be available.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

To get on to an Apprenticeship, you are likely to need four or five GCSEs (A-C), including maths, English and a science subject.

You could also take a college course to learn some of the skills needed. Relevant courses include:

  • Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Aeronautical Engineering
  • City & Guilds Level 3 Diploma for On-Aircraft Maintenance – Category A
  • EAL Level 3 Diploma in Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Technology.

Engineering courses such as mechanical, electrical or production engineering, which cover areas like CNC (computer numerical controlled) machining, CAD work and electronics, may also be a useful way to gain some of the skills needed.

As most sites are based outside of towns and cities, you may need your own transport to get to work, especially when working shifts.

Training and development

Once you start work, you would do most of your training on the job, with day or block-release at a college or private training provider. You could work towards one of the following NVQ qualifications:

  • Aeronautical Engineering levels 2 and 3
  • Performing Engineering Operations levels 1 and 2
  • Performing Manufacturing Operations levels 1 and 2.

Skills and knowledge

To become an aerospace engineering technician, you should have:

  • an interest in aircraft and flight technology
  • good practical skills
  • a flair for maths, science and IT
  • good communication skills
  • an awareness of health and safety issues
  • an understanding of engineering drawings and principles
  • a methodical approach to work
  • attention to detail
  • the ability to manage a varied workload
  • good problem-solving skills
  • good teamworking skills.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The transport equipment manufacturing industry is part of the engineering manufacturing, science and mathematics sector, represented by Semta Sector Skills Council. This sector also includes the following industries: automotive manufacture; electronics and electrical equipment manufacture; mechanical equipment manufacture; metals; and science. Across the sector as a whole, the workforce comprises approximately 2 million people, working across around 75,000 companies. UK engineering and science turnover is over £250 billion. British engineering exports amount to 37% of total UK exports of goods and services. The UK is Europe’s top location for investment in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research and development.

The UK transport equipment manufacturing industry comprises:

  • Aerospace – covers the manufacture of a range of aircraft and spacecraft (such as satellites), as well as the manufacture of essential mechanical and electrical components (such as rotors on helicopters, avionics/aircraft electrical systems and jet engines). It also includes companies that employ people to maintain, repair and overhaul aircraft.
  • Marine – covers companies that employ people involved in designing, developing, building and maintaining large cargo ships, ferries, warships, and fishing boats. Companies that construct floating and submersible drilling platforms, barges and floating docks are also included.
  • Other transport – covers a smaller number of employers that employ people to manufacture railway and tramway locomotives and rolling stock, motorcycles and bicycles and invalid carriages.

Key facts:

  • Aerospace:
    • There are an estimated 96,800 people employed in the industry, across 720 companies in Great Britain.
    • The greatest concentrations of employment in the aerospace industry are in the North West, South West and East Midlands.
    • 97% of the workforce is full‐time.
  • Marine:
    • There are an estimated 33,600 people employed in the industry, across nearly 1,620 companies in Great Britain.
    • The greatest concentrations of employment in the marine industry are in the South West, Scotland and the North West and South East of England.
    • Boatbuilding and leisure marine equipment manufacture is a growth sector in the UK.
    • Some powerboat builders export more than 90% of production.
    • 96% of the workforce is full‐time.
  • Other transport:
    • There are an estimated 14,800 people employed in the industry, across nearly 600 companies in Great Britain.
    • The greatest concentrations of employment in the other transport are in the East Midlands and West Midlands.
    • 95% of the workforce is full‐time.

Jobs in the industry range from: aerospace engineer, design engineer, marine engineer, mechanical engineer, naval architect, laboratory technician, manufacturing production manager, quality control inspector, marine craftsperson, sheet metal worker, welder, shipwright/riveter/plater, labourers in process and plant operations.


National and regional data

East Midlands – There are an estimated 20,200 employees in the regional workforce, in around 240 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (14,900) and the second largest was other transport (3,700). There is a total requirement of 2,690 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Statistical Process Control (SPC). The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment, aerospace and automotive. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Derby City, Leicester City, South Derbyshire, Charnwood, Hinckley and Bosworth and Ashfield.

East of England – There are an estimated 8,200 employees in the regional workforce, in 360 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (6,400) and the second largest was marine (1,400). There is a total requirement of 2,740 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Material Requirement Planning (MRP11); tool setting; mechanical engineering; and carpentry/woodwork. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Peterborough, Huntingdonshire, South Cambridgeshire, Luton and Basildon.

London – There are an estimated 2,700 employees in the regional workforce, in 140 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in other transport manufacture (1,400) and the second largest was aerospace (1,200). There is a total requirement of 465 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Barking and Dagenham, Hillingdon, Ealing and Hounslow.

North East – There are an estimated 1,100 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 40 companies. The largest group of employees are employed in marine companies (1,100). There is a total requirement of 850 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: assembly line/production robotics; and metal workers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Sunderland and Sedgefield.

North West – There are an estimated 28,500 employees in the regional workforce, in 260 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (22,300). There is a total requirement of 4,000 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; welding skills; and fabrication. The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment and aerospace. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Fylde, Knowsley, Crewe and Nantwich, Stockport, Oldham and Preston.

South East – There are an estimated 16,600 employees in the regional workforce, in 640 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (10,600) and the second largest was marine (4,900). There is a total requirement of 2,185 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Computer Aided Engineering (CAE); Computer Aided Design (CAD); Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM); Materials Requirement Planning (MRP); Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); and aircraft engineering. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around West Berkshire, Basingstoke and Deane, Milton Keynes, Eastleigh, Portsmouth, Crawley and Medway.

South West – There are an estimated 30,500 employees in the regional workforce, in 480 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (17,700) and the second largest was marine (11,500). There is a total requirement of 6,530 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; and aircraft engineering. There are above average concentrations of employment in the marine and aerospace industries. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Tewkesbury, Cheltenham, Stroud, South Gloucestershire, Bristol, Swindon, South Somerset, Poole and Plymouth.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 9,300 employees in the regional workforce, in 230 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (5,700) and the second largest was other transport (2,700). There is a total requirement of 1,110 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: multi‐skills. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Birmingham, Sandwell, Walsall, Coventry, Dudley and Telford and Wrekin.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 4,300 employees in the regional workforce, in 170 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (2,600) and the second largest was other transport (1,100). There is a total requirement of 815 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Kirklees, Rotherham and Kingston upon Hull.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 5,400 employees in the workforce. There is a total requirement of 150 employees needed per year between 2005 and 2014. 63% of the workforce is metal plate workers, shipwrights and riveters. Skills gaps include: welding; CNC machine operations; mechanical engineering skills; metalworking; and electrical engineering skills. Northern Ireland has above average concentrations of employment in the aerospace sector.

Scotland – There are an estimated 12,600 employees in the workforce, in just over 200 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in marine manufacture (6,000) and the second largest was aerospace (5,500). There is a total requirement of 2,170 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: assembly line/production robotics; electronics; and mechanical fitters. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around the City of Glasgow, Fife, South Lanarkshire, the City of Aberdeen, North Lanarkshire and West Lothian.

Wales – There are an estimated 11,200 employees in the workforce, in 160 companies. The largest group of employees are involved in aerospace manufacture (9,900) and the second largest was other transport (700). There is a total requirement of 1,470 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: general engineering skills; electronics; and electrical engineering. The largest industries in terms of employment are automotive, basic metals, mechanical equipment and aerospace. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Flintshire, Neath Port Talbot, Newport, Rhondda, Cynon and Taff, Bridgend and Wrexham.

[N.B. Data derived from Annual Business Inquiry, 2007, Census, 2001, and Northern Ireland Census of Employment, 2007.]

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