CV Advice

Agricultural Contractor CV Writing Tip's

As well as making sure you have a professional CV, you need to learn about the job role you are applying for and the sector that you are going into.

CV KNOWHOW's blogs provide you with an insight into a majority of sectors as it has been proven that you will be more successful in securing the role you want if you are up-to-date with information about the company and industry.

Agricultural Contractor CV Writing Service

Agricultural Contractor CV Writing Service

As an agricultural contractor, you would supply services to farmers. These services could include crop spraying, fertiliser application, hedge cutting or seed processing. A farmer may want you to harvest his/her crops. Alternatively, the work could be livestock-based. You may also do general work, such as fencing, drainage and earth moving.

You will need to have good practical agricultural skills and knowledge. You will have to be able to use and maintain farm machinery. It will also be important that you can work to deadlines.

Qualifications are not usually essential, although it could be useful to develop your skills and knowledge by attending courses.

You would work on short contracts, depending on when farmers and other employers needed your services. You may work for an agricultural contractor or be self-employed, using your own equipment.

Hours

Working hours would vary according to the time of year and the services you offer. During busy periods, you could work long, irregular hours, including evenings and weekends.

Depending on the services you provide, you might work on an on-call system to provide continuous cover; for example during lambing season.

You would often be outdoors, in all weather conditions, sometimes working in noisy or dirty surroundings. Your work could be physically demanding, involving lifting and the use of heavy tools and equipment.

You would need to travel between different contracts, and possibly drive as part of your work.

Income

As a self employed agricultural contractor, you will usually charge a competitive rate according to the task. For example, for hedge trimming with a tractor and hedgetrimmer, an agricultural contractor might charge £28 per hour. Self-employed agricultural contractors need to supply their own machinery and equipment to carry out tasks.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.

Entry requirements

To become an agricultural contractor, you would need experience of relevant agricultural work.

Qualifications are not usually essential, although it could be useful to develop your skills and knowledge by attending courses. These are available on various levels. Relevant qualifications for an agricultural contractor at level 3 include:

  • Advanced Apprenticeship in agriculture
  • EDEXCEL BTEC Level 3 Diploma or Extended Diploma in Agriculture (QCF)
  • City & Guilds Level 3 Diploma or Extended Diploma in Agriculture (QCF)
  • Lantra Awards Level 3 Award in Controlling Risks to Health and Safety in Agriculture and Production Horticulture
  • City & Guilds Level 3 Diploma in Work-based Agriculture (QCF).

 

Training and development

You can develop and add to your skills by attending a variety of courses. For example, if you work in activities such as sheep shearing, crop spraying or ploughing, you can do a number of short courses run by the City & Guilds Land-based Services and Lantra Awards.

  • Award/Certificate/Diploma in Work-based Agriculture at levels 1, 2 and 3.

Skills and knowledge

To be an agricultural contractor, you should have:

  • practical agricultural skills and knowledge
  • the ability to use and maintain plant and machinery
  • an understanding of health and safety issues
  • flexibility and the ability to deal with problems as they occur
  • the ability to manage your time and work to deadlines
  • the ability to work both alone and as part of a team
  • good communication skills
  • if self employed, business administration skills.

Industry summary

The agricultural crops industry is part of the environmental and land-based industries, represented by Lantra Sector Skills Council, which also includes the following industries: agricultural livestock; animal care; animal technology; aquaculture; equine; environmental conservation; farriery; fencing; fisheries management; floristry; game and wildlife management; land-based engineering; horticulture, landscape and sports turf; production horticulture; trees and timber; and veterinary nursing. The sector as a whole currently employs 1,126,000 people (approximately 4% of the UK workforce) in around 230,000 businesses. In addition, there are an estimated 500,000 volunteers working in the sector on a regular basis. Approximately 42% of the workforce is self-employed.

Traditionally, the agricultural industry comprised of small, mixed farming units consisting of both livestock and crop production. The industry has since moved to large arable units specialising in large scale crop production using large tractors and machinery. The agricultural crops industry includes:

  • Combinable grains such as wheat, barley
  • Oil seeds such as rape
  • Sugar and potatoes
  • Agricultural contracting
  • Agronomy – field-crop production and soil management
  • Crop consultation – advice on the utilisation of land

Key facts:

  • There are 143,000 people working in the industry, in approximately 30,000 businesses.
  • 97% of businesses employ less than 10 staff.
  • The average age of key decision makers on farms is around 55 years, of which 50% do not have a successor in place.
  • 83% of the workforce is employed full-time.
  • 56% of the workforce is self-employed.
  • 59% of the workforce has a level 2 or above qualification.

Jobs available in agricultural crops include:

  • Trainee Farm Worker / Apprentice
  • Farm Manager
  • Tractor Driver
  • Agronomist
  • Farm Worker
  • Farm/Company Director
  • Material Handler Operator
  • Sprayer Operator
  • Combine Driver
  • Head Combine Driver
  • Assistant Farm Manager
  • Associated Roles
    • Farm Secretary
    • Packer
    • Pack-house Supervisor
    • Pack-house Manager

National and regional data

England as whole has some 27,726 agricultural crop businesses employing 121,895 people.

East Midlands – There are an estimated 20,706 employees in the regional workforce, in around 5,131 businesses.

East of England – There are an estimated 29,290 employees in the regional workforce, in around 7,486 businesses.

London and the South East – There are an estimated 19,734 employees in the regional workforce, in around 3,303 businesses in the South East and 107 in London.

North East – There are an estimated 3,641 employees in the regional workforce, in around 1,022 businesses.

North West – There are an estimated 4,325 employees in the regional workforce, in around 962 businesses.

South West – There are an estimated 13,779 employees in the regional workforce, in around 2,998 businesses.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 14,028 employees in the regional workforce, in around 2,591 businesses.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 14,652 employees in the regional workforce, in around 4,127 businesses.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 1,973 employees in the regional workforce, in around 308 businesses.

Scotland – There are an estimated 17,199 employees in the regional workforce, in around 1,593 businesses.

Wales – There are an estimated 1,649 employees in the regional workforce, in around 186 businesses.

[N.B. Data derived from IDBR, 2008 and Defra, 2008.]

 

CV Advice
Purchase your CV online using: Debit Credit Card, Paypal, Google Checkout