CV Advice

Agricultural Engineering Technician CV Writing Tip's

As well as making sure you have a professional CV, you need to learn about the job role you are applying for and the sector that you are going into.

CV KNOWHOW's blogs provide you with an insight into a majority of sectors as it has been proven that you will be more successful in securing the role you want if you are up-to-date with information about the company and industry.

Agricultural Engineering Technician CV Writing Service

Agricultural Engineering Technician CV Writing Service

As an agricultural engineering technician you would install and service farm machinery. You might work in one of three areas: manufacturing, service and repair, or sales and marketing.

To do this job you should have good practical skills. You will need to be able to solve problems quickly. You should also have organisational skills, in order to manage your own workload.

You may be able to get into this job as an apprentice with an equipment manufacturer. Employers usually ask for around four GCSEs or equivalent qualifications.

Manufacturing would involve:

  • helping agricultural engineers develop new products
  • creating equipment plans using computer aided design (CAD) software
  • making parts and building the machinery
  • testing the machinery’s electrical and mechanical systems.

Service and repair would cover:

  • making maintenance checks on mechanical, electrical, electronic, hydraulic and pneumatic systems
  • installing machinery on site
  • inspecting, removing and replacing, and testing equipment.

Sales and marketing could include:

  • researching machinery developments and market trends
  • demonstrating and selling new equipment and parts
  • managing client accounts
  • dealing with enquiries and orders.

You could work for a variety of businesses, from equipment manufacturers and large farmers to livestock or fish farms.

Hours

In manufacturing, you could be working in a factory or engineering workshop on a shift system.

Service and repair jobs might involve long hours and overtime is common, particularly during the summer months.

In sales, you would be out visiting clients, which could involve overnight stays away from home.

Income

Starting salaries can be between £12,000 and £13,000 a year.

With qualifications, this can rise to between £13,500 and £20,000.

Senior agricultural technicians can earn up to £35,000 a year.

You may receive extra allowances for working shifts and overtime.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.

Entry requirements

You may be able to get into this job as an apprentice with an equipment manufacturer or service and repair contractor. Employers usually ask for around four GCSEs (grades A-C), in subjects like maths, English, science, engineering and design and technology, or equivalent qualifications.

You may be able to get on to an Apprenticeship scheme. You will need to check which schemes are available in your area. To find out more, visit the Apprenticeships website.

Another option would be to take the BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in Land-Based Technology before looking for work. The course is offered mainly by agricultural colleges and has several options, including:

  • agri-machinery
  • hydraulics and pneumatics
  • electrical and electronic systems
  • fault-finding and repair.

The National Certificate and Diploma in Agriculture also contains units in machinery operations and vehicle technology.

For more information about careers, apprenticeship schemes and colleges, contact Lantra (a Sector Skills Council name combining Land and Training), the Institution of Agricultural Engineers (IAgrE) and Careertrack.

Training and development

Once in work, you could take the NVQ in Land-based Service Engineering at levels 2 and 3. The award has several units, including:

  • diagnosing faults in tractors and machinery
  • dismantling and repairing machinery and parts
  • testing repaired equipment
  • welding skills.

 

Skills and knowledge

To become an agricultural engineering technician, you should have:

  • a keen interest in engineering technology
  • good practical skills
  • the ability to analyse and solve problems quickly
  • the ability to manage and organise your own workload
  • good communication and negotiation skills
  • a reasonable level of fitness
  • an awareness of health and safety legislation
  • the ability to work alone and as part of a team
  • a willingness to work flexibly.

Industry summary

The land‐based engineering industry is part of the environmental and land‐based industries, represented by Lantra Sector Skills Council, which also includes the following industries: agricultural crops; agricultural livestock; animal care; animal technology; aquaculture; equine; environmental conservation; farriery; fencing; fisheries management; floristry; game and wildlife management; horticulture, landscape and sports turf; production horticulture; trees and timber; and veterinary nursing. The sector as a whole currently employs 1,126,000 people (approximately 4% of the UK workforce) in around 230,000 businesses. In addition, there are an estimated 500,000 volunteers working in the sector on a regular basis. Approximately 42% of the workforce is self‐employed.

The land‐based engineering industry includes:

  • Agricultural machinery (i.e. tractors, combine harvesters, cultivation and crop protection machinery)
  • Ground care machinery (i.e. garden, sports turf and local grounds maintenance machinery)
  • Forestry machinery (i.e. chainsaws, chippers and harvesters)
  • Fixed machinery (i.e. grain/crop processing and milking equipment)
  • Construction machinery (i.e. lift trucks and mini diggers)

The industry also includes manufacturers, dealerships, machinery hire companies and independent mechanics.

Key facts:

  • There are approximately 22,833 people working in the industry in the UK, in around 3,350 businesses.
  • The industry employs around 2% of the environmental and land‐based sector’s total workforce.
  • 80% of businesses employ less than 10 staff, 18 employ between 10‐49 staff and only 1.6% employ 50 or more staff.
  • 80% of the workforce is full‐time.

Jobs in the industry include: apprentice trainee technician, manager manufacturing, demonstrator, manufacturing service engineer, diagnostic technician, farm‐based or independent/non‐franchised engineer, sales person, workshop supervisor, crane operator, yardman.

National and regional data

East Midlands – There are an estimated 4,266 employees in the regional workforce, in 350 around businesses.

East of England – There are an estimated 1,238 employees in the regional workforce, in around 415 businesses.

London – There are an estimated 462 employees in the regional workforce, in around 95 businesses.

North East – There are an estimated 514 employees in the regional workforce, in around 75 businesses.

North West – There are an estimated 1,490 employees in the regional workforce, in around 260 businesses.

South East – There are an estimated 2,353 employees in the regional workforce, in around 335 businesses.

South West – There are an estimated 3,264 employees in the regional workforce, in around 390 businesses.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 1,980 employees in the regional workforce, in around 300 businesses.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 898 employees in the regional workforce, in around 295 businesses.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 1,957 employees in the regional workforce, in around 295 businesses.

Scotland – There are an estimated 2,529 employees in the regional workforce, in around 355 businesses.

Wales – There are an estimated 1,881 employees in the regional workforce, in around 185 businesses.

[N.B. Date derived from Experian National Surveys Database, 2008.]

CV Advice
Purchase your CV online using: Debit Credit Card, Paypal, Google Checkout