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Agricultural Inspector CV Writing Tip's

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Agricultural Inspector CV Writing Service

Agricultural Inspector CV Writing Service

Agricultural inspectors are responsible for the standards and regulations in farming. If you would like visiting different workplaces each day and you are interested in farming, this job could be perfect for you.

To do this job, you will need to have good observational and problem-solving skills. You will need fairness and reliability. You will also need good written and spoken communication skills.

To be an agricultural inspector, you would usually need at least A levels or equivalent qualifications, and at least two years’ relevant work experience.

The work

As an inspector for the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), you would focus on occupational health and safety. You would visit premises to:

  • check machinery, the environment and buildings
  • investigate accidents and complaints
  • make sure that regulations are being followed
  • write reports and make recommendations.

You would also sometimes give evidence in court cases.

As an inspector for the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), you would enforce UK and EU legislation. You may work for an agency on behalf of DEFRA, such as the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratory Agency. Your job would be to:

  • collect and analyse data
  • check record keeping on farms, such as stock movements and numbers
  • investigate animal welfare concerns
  • issue certificates
  • plan for preventing, controlling and wiping out animal and poultry disease.

As a food assurance scheme inspector, you would check that agricultural practice meets the Assured Food Standards (known as the Red Tractor scheme). Before granting certification and a seal of approval you would:

  • inspect the health and welfare of livestock
  • check crop management and production methods
  • check environmental impact
  • check animal feed
  • make sure livestock housing is safe and of a suitable size
  • check animal identification and veterinary treatments
  • check record keeping and documentation.

Hours

You would usually work from 9 to 5, Monday to Friday, possibly with some extra hours depending on the particular job.

Although you would be office based, the job involves frequent travel, and you would spend at least half of your time visiting workplaces. There may be occasional overnight stays away from home.


Income

Inspectors can earn between £18,000 and over £35,000 a year.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

To become an agricultural inspector, you would usually need at least A levels or equivalent qualifications, and at least two years’ relevant work experience. For some jobs you would need a degree or equivalent professional qualification.

To work in a specialist inspectorate, you may need relevant industry qualifications. For example, for the Sea Fisheries Inspectorate, it would be useful to have a certificate of competency to act as an officer on a merchant ship or a mate of a fishing vessel, or an equivalent naval qualification.


Training and development

You would usually have a two-year training period, which would combine practical on-the-job training with short in-house courses. You would develop your skills by accompanying and observing experienced inspectors, then carrying out supervised site visits.

As a Health and Safety Inspector you may be able to work towards NVQ Level 4 in Occupational Health and Safety Practice, or study for a postgraduate qualification in Occupational Health and Safety.

As an agricultural inspector, you would need to keep your knowledge of the technical and legal aspects of the job up to date, for example by doing short courses.


Skills and knowledge

To become an agricultural inspector, you will need to have:

  • knowledge and experience of agriculture
  • good observation and problem-solving skills
  • fairness and reliability
  • up-to-date knowledge of relevant laws
  • good judgement
  • good written and spoken communication skills
  • IT skills.

Opportunities

Vacancies are advertised in the national press and on employers’ websites.

Once you have several years’ experience, you could progress to a senior position, or work as a consultant in occupational health, giving advice and lecturing. You could also move into public health or conservation.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The agricultural livestock industry is part of the environmental and land‐based industries, represented by Lantra Sector Skills Council, which also includes the following industries: agricultural crops; animal care; animal technology; aquaculture; equine; environmental conservation; farriery; fencing; fisheries management; floristry; game and wildlife management; land‐based engineering; landscape; production horticulture; trees and timber; and veterinary nursing. The sector as a whole currently employs 1,126,000 people (approximately 4% of the UK workforce) in around 230,000 businesses. In addition, there are an estimated 500,000 volunteers working in the sector on a regular basis. Approximately 42% of the workforce is self‐employed.

Traditionally, the agricultural industry comprised of small, mixed farming units consisting of both livestock and crop production. The industry has since moved to large arable units specialising in one or two areas of production. The agricultural livestock industry includes the farming of: cows; sheep; dairy; pigs; poultry and eggs; plus other livestock and related agricultural contracting. Many farms also produce fodder crops. Others combine livestock production with arable or horticultural crops.

Key facts:

  • There are approximately 315,300 people working in the industry.
  • There are approximately 94,000 agricultural livestock businesses, of which:
    • 33% are in cattle
    • 60% are in sheep and lambs
    • 2% are in pigs
    • 4% are in poultry
    • 27,000 are mixed farms which combine the farming of one or more of the livestock within other activities
  • 98% of businesses employ less than 10 staff.
  • The average age of key decision makers on farms is 55 years, of which 50% do not have a successor in place.
  • 83% of the workforce is employed full‐time.
  • 56% of the workforce is self‐employed.
  • 59% of the workforce has a level 2 or above qualification.

Jobs in the industry include:

  • Beef and dairy – assistant stockperson, technical advisor/consultant, assistant farm manager, beef contract rearer, herdsperson, beef technician, calf rearer, relief milker, unit manager
  • Poultry – assistant farm manager, vaccinator, stockperson, catcher, driver, egg collector, farm secretary
  • Pigs – basic stockperson, contract breeder, contract finisher, fieldsperson (breed), section head (farrowing)
  • Sheep – lambing assistant, sheep shearer, shepherd, contract lamber

National and regional data

England has 53,794 businesses involved in agricultural livestock employing 172,682 people.

East Midlands – There are an estimated 13,976 employees in the regional workforce, in around 4,394 businesses.

East of England – There are an estimated 8,453 employees in the regional workforce, in around 2,484 businesses.

London and the South East – There are an estimated 18,643 employees in the regional workforce, in around 5,077 businesses in the South East and 128 in London.

North East – There are an estimated 7,283 employees in the regional workforce, in around 2,348 businesses.

North West – There are an estimated 27,942 employees in the regional workforce, in around 8,988 businesses.

South West – There are an estimated 53,280 employees in the regional workforce, in around 16,717 businesses.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 24,565 employees in the regional workforce, in around 7,734 businesses.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 18,879 employees in the regional workforce, in around 5,923 businesses.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 45,456 employees in the regional workforce, in around 15,137 businesses.

Scotland – There are an estimated 43,650 employees in the regional workforce, in around 12,352 businesses.

Wales – There are an estimated 53,552 employees in the regional workforce, in around 13,093 businesses.

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