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Cnc Machinist CV Writing Tip's

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Cnc Machinist CV Writing Service

Cnc Machinist CV Writing Service

Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machinery is used in manufacturing and engineering. Skilled engineering craft machinists create precision engineered parts, using a CNC machine tool to shape blank metal or plastic/composite materials. If you are interested in computer programming and like engineering, you might like to become a CNC machinist.

To do this job you will need to be able to read engineering drawings. You will need good practical skills. You will also need a high level of accuracy.

You may be able to get into this career through an engineering Apprenticeship.

The work

You would work mainly with metals but you could also deal with wood, composite materials and plastics. Most of the parts you made would be for use in the automotive, power, aerospace and manufacturing industries.

Your typical duties would include:

  • programming the machine tool with data taken from technical drawings
  • planning the most efficient order of machine operations for each job
  • choosing the right tools for each stage
  • setting the cutting speeds and tolerance levels
  • carrying out the operations
  • checking that work meets quality and technical standards
  • routine maintenance.

CNC machines produce large quantities of components to exactly the same standard and machinists can learn to operate a variety of CNC machine tools such as:

  • lathes
  • grinding machines
  • milling machines
  • cutting machines
  • drills and presses
  • machining centres that combine the above functions.

Hours

You would normally work 37 to 40 hours a week, possibly on shifts covering weekends, evenings and nights.

You would spend most of your time in a factory or workshop, operating and monitoring the machines.

You would use mechanical hoists to put heavier materials onto the machines, or lift and place smaller sections by hand.

For most jobs you would wear protective overalls, boots, goggles and ear defenders.


Income

Starting salaries can be around £14,000 a year.

Experienced machinists can earn around £20,000.

With supervisory duties, this can rise to £28,000 a year.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

You may be able to get into this career through an engineering Apprenticeship. The range of Apprenticeships available in your area will depend on the local jobs market and the types of skills employers need.

To get onto an Apprenticeship, employers may ask for GCSEs (A-C), in subjects like maths, English, science, engineering and design and technology.

Another choice would be to take a college course to learn some practical engineering skills. Relevant courses include:

  • BTEC Level 2 Certificate or Diploma in Engineering
  • BTEC Level 3 Certificate, Diploma or Extended Diploma in Engineering
  • BTEC Level 3 Diploma and Extended Diploma in Manufacturing Engineering/Mechanical Engineering
  • City and Guilds Certificate or Diploma in Engineering
  • EAL Certificate or Diploma in Engineering.

Training and development

You will usually receive on-the-job training once you start work. Your employer may encourage you to take the qualifications most relevant to your area of work, such as:

  • NVQ Performing Engineering Operations at levels 1 and 2
  • NVQ Mechanical Manufacturing Engineering at levels 2 and 3
  • NVQ Engineering Woodworking, Pattern and Model Making Level 3
  • NVQ Engineering Toolmaking Level 3
  • EAL Diploma in Engineering and Technology Level 3
  • EAL Diploma in Advanced Manufacture Techniques – Computer Numerical Control (CNC).

Skills and knowledge

To become a CNC machinist, you will need:

  • the ability to read engineering drawings and instructions
  • good practical skills
  • IT and maths skills
  • a high level of accuracy
  • concentration and focus
  • the ability to work unsupervised
  • a reasonable level of fitness
  • to be good at working with your hands.

Opportunities

Most opportunities would be in the mechanical engineering, motor vehicle, aerospace and shipbuilding industries. There could also be some vacancies in engineering maintenance, such as rail transport or power generation. There has been a shortage of skilled CNC machinists in engineering for many years, which should increase your chances of getting work if you have the right skills.

With experience and further training, you could move into supervisory or quality inspection jobs, or move up to technician-level roles in an engineering design or drawing office.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The mechanical equipment manufacturing industry is part of the engineering manufacturing, science and mathematics sector, represented by Semta Sector Skills Council. This sector also includes the following industries: automotive manufacture; electronics and electrical equipment manufacture; metals; transport equipment manufacture, including marine and aerospace; and science. Across the sector as a whole, the workforce comprises approximately 2 million people, working across around 75,000 companies. UK engineering and science turnover is over £250 billion. British engineering exports amount to 37% of total UK exports of goods and services. The UK is Europe’s top location for investment in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research and development.

The UK mechanical equipment manufacturing industry includes companies involved in the manufacture of:

  • turbines( such as jet aircraft engines)
  • gears and compressors (known as machinery for the production and use of mechanical power)
  • machine tools (like lathes and milling machines used in factories and tool rooms)
  • weapons and ammunition
  • domestic appliances (such as washing machines)

The industry is made up of many Small and Medium Sized Employers (SMEs), each employing less than 250 people. The industry is important as some parts are an essential part of supply chains, for subcontractors in the aerospace, automotive and shipbuilding sectors.

Key facts:

  • There are an estimated 270,900 people employed in the mechanical equipment manufacturing industry, across 13,770 workplaces in Great Britain.
  • The greatest concentrations of employment in the mechanical equipment industry are in the West Midlands, South East and East of England.
  • 91% of the workforce is full‐time.
  • In engineering, an estimated 6% of the workforce is self‐employed.

Jobs in the industry range from: manufacturing production manager, design engineer, mechanical engineer, production engineer, quality control inspector, engineering maintenance technician, engineering craft machinist, fitter, sheet metal worker, welder, labourers in process and plant operations.


National and regional data

East Midlands – There are an estimated 25,400 employees in the regional workforce, in around 1,400 companies. There is a total requirement of 5,720 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; Materials Requirement Planning (MRP); assembly line/production robotics; tool setting; general engineering skills; mechanical engineering; and multi‐skills. 20% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment, aerospace and automotive. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Derby City, Leicester City, South Derbyshire, Charnwood, Hinckley and Bosworth and Ashfield.

East of England – There are an estimated 31,100 employees in the regional workforce, in 1,500 companies. There is a total requirement of 6,910 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; tool setting; Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM); assembly line/production robotics; welding skills; craft skills; electronics; fabrication; and toolmakers. 17% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are mechanical equipment, electronics and metal products. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Peterborough, Huntingdonshire, South Cambridgeshire, Luton and Basildon.

London – There are an estimated 8,500 employees in the regional workforce, in 740 companies. There is a total requirement of 1,550 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM). 11% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are mechanical equipment, electronics and metal products. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Barking and Dagenham, Hillingdon, Ealing and Hounslow.

North East – There are an estimated 15,800 employees in the regional workforce, in 500 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,280 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: welding skills. 23% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are mechanical equipment, metal products and automotive. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Sunderland and Sedgefield.

North West – There are an estimated 31,200 employees in the regional workforce, in 1,540 companies. There is a total requirement of 6,410 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; tool setting; Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM); assembly line/production robotics; welding skills; mechanical engineering; general machining; mechanical fitters; and turners. 18% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment and aerospace. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Fylde, Knowsley, Crewe and Nantwich, Stockport, Oldham and Preston.

South East – There are an estimated 34,900 employees in the regional workforce, in 1,900 companies. There is a total requirement of 6,370 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; general engineering skills; assembly line/production robotics; tool setting; welding skills; metal workers; general machining; tool makers; and carpentry/woodwork. 14% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around West Berkshire, Basingstoke and Deane, Milton Keynes, Eastleigh, Portsmouth, Crawley and Medway.

South West – There are an estimated 26,200 employees in the regional workforce, in just under 1,250 companies. There is a total requirement of 5,280 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; Computer Aided Engineering (CAE); Materials Requirement Planning (MRP); mechanical engineering; and general machining. 23% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are mechanical equipment, electronics and metal products. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Tewkesbury, Cheltenham, Stroud, South Gloucestershire, Bristol, Swindon, South Somerset, Poole and Plymouth.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 41,200 employees in the regional workforce, in just under 2,030 companies. There is a total requirement of 6,250 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: tool setting; CNC machine operation; electrical engineering; Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); and manufacturing. 16% of the workforce is employed as metal working production and maintenance fitters. The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment and automotive. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Birmingham, Sandwell, Walsall, Coventry, Dudley and Telford and Wrekin.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 26,200 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 1,430 companies. There is a total requirement of 5,440 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: general engineering skills; Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM); Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); CNC machine operation; and mechanical engineering. 18% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are metal products, mechanical equipment and automotive. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Kirklees, Rotherham and Kingston upon Hull.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 7,000 employees in the workforce. There is a total requirement of 270 employees needed per year between 2005 and 2014. 16% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. Skills gaps include: welding; CNC machine operations; mechanical engineering skills; metalworking; and electrical engineering skills. The largest industries in terms of employment are electrical and electronics industry and the metals industry.

Scotland – There are an estimated 19,900 employees in the workforce, in just under 930 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,680 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Computer Aided design (CAD); general engineering skills; Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); CNC machine operation; electronics; mechanical engineering; plating; and multi‐skills. 17% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are electronics, metal products and mechanical equipment. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around the City of Glasgow, Fife, South Lanarkshire, the City of Aberdeen, North Lanarkshire and West Lothian.

Wales – There are an estimated 10,500 employees in the workforce, in 530 companies. There is a total requirement of 1,350 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; Computer Aided design (CAD); toolmakers; Materials Requirement Planning (MRP); tool setting; and welding skills. 14% of the workforce is employed as metal machining setters and setter operators. The largest industries in terms of employment are automotive, basic metals, mechanical equipment and aerospace. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Flintshire, Neath Port Talbot, Newport, Rhondda, Cynon and Taff, Bridgend and Wrexham.

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