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Health Trainer CV Writing Tip's

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Health Trainer CV Writing Service

Health Trainer CV Writing Service

If you are enthusiastic about the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle, and you’ve got good motivational skills, this job could be ideal for you.

As a health trainer, you would advise people about healthier lifestyle choices in order to improve their general health and wellbeing.

In this job you will need to know what the health issues are in your local community. You will have to have enthusiasm to inspire people make changes in their lives. You will also need to have excellent communication skills to relate to a variety of different people.

To get into this job it will help if you have some experience working in community roles. Some employers will prefer you to have GCSE grade C in English, and you may also be asked for an NVQ Level 3 or equivalent qualification. A background in health and fitness or nutritional advice will also help you.

The work

Your work within the community could focus on issues such as:

  • improving the amount of exercise people take
  • the importance of practising safe sex
  • helping people stop smoking
  • the positive effects of lowering alcohol intake
  • the benefits of breastfeeding
  • improving access to healthy lifestyles in communities with the greatest needs.

You would encourage people to understand and adapt their behaviour by providing information and practical support on a one-to-one basis, as well as in groups. Your work to improve the health of the community could also include:

  • connecting people to relevant local services
  • helping people understand how their behaviour effects their health
  • supporting and motivating individuals to change harmful habits
  • explaining the benefits of healthier food and lifestyle choices
  • encouraging greater community integration and sense of togetherness
  • recording activity levels and results, and using these to motivate clients.

Hours

You would typically work between 16 and 30 hours a week, as part-time positions are more common than full-time. Your hours may occasionally include evenings or weekends, in order to run group workshops and meetings.

You would be based in community settings, such as GP practices, community leisure centres and occasionally outdoors.


Income

  • Health trainers can earn between £15,600 and £18,600 a year
  • Supervisors can earn between £21,000 and £27,500.

Many health trainer jobs are offered on a part-time basis, so earnings would be a portion of full-time rates (known as ‘pro rata’ payment). This means that actual annual income may be less than above.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

To become a health trainer, you will need:

  • knowledge of the health issues facing the community
  • good communication skills in English (and for some jobs, a second community language)
  • experience (paid or voluntary) of working with local community groups.

Some employers will prefer you to have GCSE grade C in English, and you may also be asked for an NVQ Level 3 or equivalent qualification.

You could have an advantage when looking for work if you have qualifications or work experience in an area such as:

  • personal training
  • fitness instructing
  • nutritional therapy or dietetics.

See the related job profiles for details about qualifications and training in these careers.


Training and development

Once you are working as a health trainer, you will receive on-the-job training from your employer. This can vary depending on the focus of your duties, but will usually include:

  • health and safety
  • communication skills
  • record-keeping
  • time management.

You may also be encouraged to study for a City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate for Health Trainers, which covers:

  • building and maintaining good working relationships with communities
  • health promotion and effective communication skills
  • enabling individuals to change their behaviour to improve their health and wellbeing.

You could also work towards NVQ levels 2, 3 and 4 in Community Development Work.


Skills and knowledge

To be a health trainer you will need to have:

  • a good understanding of the benefits of healthy lifestyle choices
  • the ability to motivate others and inspire trust
  • an awareness of the health needs of the local community
  • enthusiasm for your subject
  • the ability to keep up to date with developments in health advice
  • excellent communication and listening skills
  • the ability to form good working relationships with outside organisations
  • good organisational and planning skills
  • good time management
  • the ability to work alone and as part of a team.

Opportunities

You will find most job opportunities with local NHS primary care trusts (PCTs), and some with local authorities. For job vacancies you should contact your local PCT (see NHS Choices website for a list).

With experience you could progress to team supervisor, or senior health improvement specialist. For these roles, you may need a public health related degree or postgraduate qualification. You could also move into related careers in health promotion or community development.


Related industry information

Industry summary

The health sector is represented by Skills for Health Sector Skills Council, which comprises three sub‐sectors:

  • National Health Service (NHS)
  • Independent Healthcare Sector (such as private and charitable healthcare providers)
  • Third Sector (healthcare) (such as small local community and voluntary groups, registered charities, foundations, trusts, social enterprises and co‐operatives)

The health sector is made up of hospitals, doctors’ surgeries, dental practices, the ambulance service, nursing homes, residential care homes, complementary medicine and a huge range of other health related activities, from sight tests in opticians to research in medical laboratories. Most people in the health sector work in the publicly funded National Health Service (NHS), which includes:

  • primary care (organisations which the public goes to first) – Doctors/General Practitioners (GPs), NHS Walk in Centres, NHS Direct, Out of Hours Emergency Care
  • secondary care (organisations which the public are referred onto) – Ambulance Trusts, NHS Trusts/hospitals, NHS Foundation Trusts/hospitals, Mental Health Trusts, Care Trusts (provide joint health and social care activities)

NHS policy in England is directed from the centre by the Department of Health. Local organisations, known as Primary Care Trusts (PCTs), are in charge of providing and commissioning services, controlling the majority of the budget. PCTs are overseen by 10 regional organisations called Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs).

The independent sector includes companies and charities that offer hospital and specialist services usually after referral from a doctor. Operations and other work are carried out in private hospitals, independent treatment centres, mental health units and hospices.

Key facts:

  • The health sector is the largest employer in the UK, representing 5.5% of the working age population of the UK and 7.3% of the working age population that are currently in employment.
  • It is estimated that the sector employs over 2 million people, including:
    • over 1.5 million people in the NHS (72%)
    • over 0.5 million people in the Independent Healthcare sector (26%)
    • almost 40,000 in the voluntary sector (2%)
  • 56% of the workforce has a higher education qualification (or equivalent).
  • The age profile for the sector shows an older than average workforce, which is due in part to the fact that it takes some professions a long time to train and can mean that people enter the sector later.

There is a varied list of jobs in the sector ranging from a diverse number of clinical roles, to support and infrastructure staff, for instance: Allied Health Professionals (AHPs); Ambulance Staff; Dental Staff; Doctors/Medical staff; Nursing staff; Midwifery Staff; Healthcare Scientists; Health Informatics Staff; Management; Wider Healthcare Team; Complementary Therapists.


National and regional data

High proportions of the health sector workforce are located in:

  • London
  • South East
  • North West

East Midlands

  • The health sector employs 131,515 people, which accounts for 7% of all employment in the region.
  • The East Midlands employs 8% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 29% of all employment across the sector or 41,200 employees.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 133,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

East of England

  • The health sector employs 164,720 people, which accounts for 7% of all employment in the region.
  • The East of England employs 9.8 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 30% of all employment across the sector or 52,300 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 14% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 103,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

London

  • The health sector employs over 249,524 people, which accounts for 6% of all the employment in the region.
  • London employs 15% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 33% of all employment across the sector or 78,500 employees.
  • Vacancies in health and social work account for 12% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 146,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

North East

  • The health sector employs 89,201 people, which accounts for 8.7% of all employment in the region.
  • The North East employs 5.3 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 25% of all employment across the sector or 23,800 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 12% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be almost 46,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

North West

  • The health sector employs 251,960 people, which accounts for 8% of all employment in the region.
  • The North West employs 15% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 23.5% of all employment across the sector or 59,200 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work account for 11% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 133,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

South East

  • The health sector employs 264,071 people, which accounts for 7.1% of all employment in the region.
  • The South East employs 15.7% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 23.5% of all employment across the sector or 59,200 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 12% of all Industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 164,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

South West

  • The health sector employs 182,187 people, which accounts for 8.2% of all employment in the region.
  • The South West employs 10.8 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 30% of all employment across the sector or 60,700 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 12% of all Industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 105,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

West Midlands

  • The health sector employs 168,746 people, which accounts for 7.2% of all employment in the region.
  • The West Midlands employs 10% of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 25% of all employment across the sector or 43,000 employees.
  • Vacancies in the health and social work sector account for 9% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 108,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

Yorkshire and the Humber

  • The health sector employs 182,848 people, which accounts for 8.2% of all employment in the region.
  • Yorkshire and the Humber employ 10.9 % of the total health sector workforce for England.
  • The private sector accounts for 24% of the total health care workforce or 42,000 employees.
  • Vacancies in health and social work account for 11% of all industry vacancies.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, the total requirement for workforce will be approximately 97,000 people. This is the total of the predicted expansion plus replacement demand.

Northern Ireland

  • The health sector employs 61,300 people.
  • Northern Ireland employs 3% of the total health sector workforce.
  • 81% of the workforce is female.
  • 26% of the workforce is aged 35‐44 years.
  • 96% of the workforce is white.
  • 10% of the workforce reports a disability.
  • 48% of the workforce is in Associate Professional and Technical occupations.
  • 23% of organisations in the health and social work sector report vacancies.

Scotland

  • The health sector employs 201,500 people.
  • Scotland employs 10% of the total health sector workforce.
  • 78% of the workforce is female.
  • 30% of the workforce is aged 45‐54 years.
  • 95% of the workforce is white.
  • 14% of the workforce reports a disability.
  • 39% of the workforce is in Associate Professional and Technical occupations.
  • 23% of organisations in the health and social work sector report vacancies.

Wales

  • The health sector employs 114,900 people.
  • Wales employs 6% of the total health sector workforce.
  • 74% of the workforce is female.
  • 34% of the workforce is aged 45‐54 years.
  • 94% of the workforce is white.
  • 18% of the workforce reports a disability.
  • 40% of the workforce is in Associate Professional and Technical occupations.
  • 27% of organisations in the health and social work sector report vacancies.

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