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Horse Groom CV Writing Tip's

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Horse Groom CV Writing Service

Horse Groom CV Writing Service

If you like practical work and love horses, this job could be for you.

Horse grooms, sometimes known as stable lads/girls or stable hands, look after horses, making sure they are healthy and in good condition.

In this job you would need to be observant. You would also need to be patient and willing to carry out routine tasks.

Not all employers ask for qualifications, but there are courses you can do in horse care and horse management, which may give you an advantage. You could get experience by volunteering at a local stable. You may be able to get into this job through an Apprenticeship scheme.

The work

As a groom, you would:

  • provide food and water for horses
  • replace bedding
  • clean equipment such as saddles and bridles (‘tack’)
  • clean, brush and sometimes clip, horses’ coats
  • muck out stables
  • check for changes in the condition of horses and report problems
  • treat minor wounds, change dressings and give medication
  • follow instructions from vets when treatment is needed.

You may also be responsible for exercising the horses each day.

If you work with show jumpers or race horses, you will prepare them for events, and may accompany them. In studs and breeding yards you will work with stallions, mares and foals, and may help vets to deliver foals. In riding schools you may greet clients, lead riders out on foot, and accompany them on horseback.


Hours

You would usually work 40 hours a week, including early mornings, late nights and weekends. Overtime is often available, and you may be able to do part-time or casual work.

You would need to be prepared to work in cold, wet and muddy conditions, and would wear protective clothing and footwear.

You may be provided with accommodation, which may be quite basic.


Income

  • Grooms can start at around £12,500 a year
  • Experienced grooms can earn around £16,000
  • Head lads/girls in a racing yard can earn £20,000 or more.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for your own horse and riding lessons.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

You must be at least 16, and there may be weight restrictions for some jobs. Although you may not need qualifications, employers may prefer you to have experience, and some may ask for a nationally-recognised qualification such as:

  • BTEC Level 2 Certificate and Diploma in Horse Care
  • BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Horse Management
  • British Horse Society (BHS) Stage 1 in Horse Knowledge and Care
  • Association of British Riding Schools (ABRS) Preliminary Horse Care and Riding Certificate.

For BHS or ABRS qualifications you must be at least 16, and would usually need experience of handling and riding horses. Visit the BHS and ABRS websites for details.

You could get practical experience as a volunteer, for example helping out at a local stable. This could give you an advantage when looking for paid work.

You can train in race-horse care at the British Racing School in Newmarket and the Northern Racing College in Doncaster. You will not need riding experience to start, as there is a non-rider option up to NVQ level 2. However, most trainees do ride.

If you are interested in the horse breeding industry, you can train at the National Stud in Newmarket or at other training centres. See the Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association website for details.

You may be able to get into this job through an Apprenticeship scheme. The range of Apprenticeships available in your area will depend on the local jobs market and the types of skills employers need from their workers.

Visit the British Horse Racing Board careers website for full details of careers in horse-racing and breeding.


Training and development

You will usually receive on-the-job training when you start work as a horse groom. You can also work towards:

  • Level 2 Certificate and Diploma in Horse Care
  • Level 3 Diploma in Horse Management.

You can develop your skills by taking British Horse Society (BHS) and Association of British Riding Schools (ABRS) qualifications.

BHS qualifications include:

  • BHS Horse Knowledge and Care and Riding Stages 2, 3 and 4
  • BHS teaching and instructor qualifications.

ABRS qualifications include:

  • ABRS Groom’s Certificate
  • ABRS Groom’s Diploma.

 

Skills and knowledge

To be a horse groom you should have:

  • good observational skills
  • patience and willingness to do routine tasks
  • awareness of health and safety issues
  • the ability to work alone and as part of a team
  • good communication skills
  • competence in riding
  • experience of looking after horses (you may not need this for some jobs).

Opportunities

You could be employed at a stud farm, riding and trekking centre, livery yard, racing yard, competition yard or in a more specialised business such as a horse rehabilitation centre. You may also be able to find work with a private owner.

With experience and further training, you could take charge of a yard or become head groom. In a racing yard, you could progress to head lad/girl, travelling head lad/girl and perhaps to assistant trainer or trainer.

On a stud farm, you could become a stud groom, stallion handler or stud manager. If you work in a riding stable you could complete BHS or ABRS teaching qualifications to become a riding instructor.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The equine industry is part of the environmental and land‐based industries, represented by Lantra Sector Skills Council, which also includes the following industries: agricultural crops; agricultural livestock; animal care; animal technology; aquaculture; environmental conservation; farriery; fencing; fisheries management; floristry; game and wildlife management; land‐based engineering; horticulture, landscape and sports turf; production horticulture; trees and timber; and veterinary nursing. The sector as a whole currently employs 1,126,000 people (approximately 4% of the UK workforce) in around 230,000 businesses. In addition, there are an estimated 500,000 volunteers working in the sector on a regular basis. Approximately 42% of the workforce is self‐employed.

Equine industry includes the welfare, husbandry, supervision and riding of horses, which means there are opportunities ranging from livery operations to thoroughbred racehorse training. Employers in the industry include: riding schools; livery yards; racing yards; breeders; trainers; and those involved in various other equine‐related activities, such as coaches and rehabilitation. Equine encompasses:

  • Riding schools and livery yards
  • Competition and racing yards
  • Studs
  • Instructors
  • Working horses
  • Clubs and hunts
  • Diversified equine activities
  • Equine paraprofessionals, such as Equine Dental Technicians, Barefoot Trimmers (i.e. people who trim horses’ hooves that do not have shoes)

Key facts:

  • There are 20,700 people working in the industry, in around 3,450 businesses.
  • There are approximately 100 barefoot trimmers and 200 equine dental technicians in the UK.
  • 80% of businesses employ 5 or less staff, 18% employ between 6‐25 staff, and only 2% employing between 26‐100 staff.
  • Volunteers are a significant part of the workforce within the industry.

Jobs in the industry include: apprentice jockey, performance groom, PTT instructor, BHSAI Assistant Instructor, stable person, stallion handler, Coach Level 1 Stud Yard Supervisor, Coach Level 2 Stud‐hand, Coach Level 3 Supervised/Assistant Groom, foaling specialist, trek leader, yard manager, horse transporter, yearling manager, jockey.


National and regional data

East Midlands – There are an estimated 1,900 employees in the regional workforce, in around 300 businesses.

East of England – There are an estimated 3,250 employees in the regional workforce, in around 450 businesses.

London – There are an estimated 1,000 employees in the regional workforce, in around 250 businesses.

North East – There are an estimated 500 employees in the regional workforce, in around 100 businesses.

North West – There are an estimated 1,850 employees in the regional workforce, in around 250 businesses.

South East – There are an estimated 3,550 employees in the regional workforce, in around 600 businesses.

South West – There are an estimated 2,700 employees in the regional workforce, in around 400 businesses.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 2,450 employees in the regional workforce, in around 300 businesses.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 1,550 employees in the regional workforce, in around 300 businesses.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 350 employees in the regional workforce, in around 50 businesses.

Scotland – There are an estimated 1,000 employees in the regional workforce, in around 250 businesses.

Wales – There are an estimated 550 employees in the regional workforce, in around 150 businesses.

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