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Kitchen Manager (Head Chef) CV Writing Tip's

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Kitchen Manager (Head Chef) CV Writing Service

Kitchen Manager (Head Chef) CV Writing Service

As a kitchen manager or head chef, you would use your knowledge and experience of professional cooking to lead a team of staff and efficiently run a kitchen. If you are interested in food and you can lead a team in an organised way, this job could be perfect for you.

In this job you will need good leadership skills. You will need to work quickly and calmly when under pressure. You will also need to control a budget.

To get into this job you will need experience in a professional kitchen, running your own section. The main way to achieve this is by working your way up from kitchen assistant to trainee chef, then section chef and manager/head chef. Alternatively, you could do a course that combined classroom learning with practical experience. You may be able to get into this job through an Apprenticeship scheme.

The work

As a head chef your duties would include:

  • planning menus
  • making sure food is of the right quality and price and is produced on time
  • managing stock
  • ordering food from suppliers
  • controlling a budget and keeping accurate records
  • organising the staff duty rota.

You would organise and oversee the work produced, decide which tasks need to be done and share these among the team. Your role would also usually include preparation and cooking of food and the recruitment, training and development of staff.


Hours

You would typically work shifts, involving early mornings and late nights (including weekends and public holidays). Working in the kitchen would be hot and humid and, at key meal times, you would be working under pressure. You would wear a uniform and hat to protect your clothing and for hygiene reasons. For part of the day, you may work at a desk away from the kitchen generating menu ideas with the restaurant manager and placing orders with food suppliers.


Income

Kitchen managers can start on between £15,000 and £20,000 a year. With experience, this can rise to around £25,000. A head chef working in a top hotel may earn up to £50,000.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

You will need a passion for food, plus experience in a professional kitchen, running your own section before you can become a kitchen manager or head chef.

The main way to achieve this is by working your way up from kitchen assistant to trainee chef, then section chef and manager/head chef.

Another way to prepare for this work would be to take a course that combines classroom-based study with practical experience and placements. Relevant qualifications include:

  • Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Professional Cookery
  • Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Professional Cookery

You will also need qualifications in food safety, such as:

  • Level 3 Award in Supervision of Food Safety in Catering
  • Level 3 Award in Practical Supervision of Food Safety in Catering

If you already have a degree-level qualification in an unrelated subject you can take a one-year BA (Hons) conversion course in, for example, Culinary Arts Management.

Alternatively, you may be able to get into kitchen work through an Apprenticeship scheme such as the Level 3 Apprenticeship in Hospitality and Catering (Professional Cookery).


Training and development

It may help your career to continue your training by taking qualifications such as:

  • Level 4 Award in Managing Food Safety in Catering
  • Level 3 Award in Nutrition for Healthier Food and Special Diets.

Skills and knowledge

To be a head chef you should have:

  • a creative interest in food and cookery
  • the ability to work under pressure and make quick decisions
  • high standards of cleanliness and hygiene
  • the ability to organise and plan your own work and that of others
  • strong communication skills
  • leadership and management skills
  • the ability to control a budget and work with figures
  • stamina with the ability to cope in a hot and busy kitchen
  • the ability to deal calmly with unexpected situations and crises.

Opportunities

According to People 1st, the Sector Skills Council for this field, there is a shortage of skilled chefs in the UK.

You may find work within hotels and restaurants, catering departments of local authorities, nurseries, schools and colleges, the NHS and Armed Forces. This can include full-time and part-time hours, as well as temporary and seasonal jobs throughout the UK and overseas.

With experience, you could go on to manage larger kitchens and more staff. You could also set up your own business, running your own restaurant or franchise.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The restaurants industry is part of the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector, represented by People 1st Sector Skills Council. This sector also includes the following industries: food and service management; gambling; hotels; pubs, bars and nightclubs; self‐catering accommodation, holiday centres and youth hostels; travel and tourist services; visitor attractions; and hospitality services. It has grown over the last 20 years and, despite the current recession, is predicted to continue to grow in the medium to long term. The sector as a whole currently employs almost 2 million people.

The restaurant industry provides food and drink and includes:

  • Fast food establishments – such as McDonalds, Burger King and KFC, as well as traditional outlets such as fish and chips shops, sushi bars and sandwich bars
  • Cafes and coffee shops
  • Mainstream Restaurants – these are high street restaurants which tend to be mid‐price and include many branded and themed chains such as Pizza Express, Garfunkel’s and Ask
  • Fine Dining – these tend to be more expensive restaurants that offer unique dishes and, sometimes, more experimental cuisine.

Key facts:

  • There are 614,100 people working in the restaurant industry.
  • 14% of the workforce has an NVQ Level 4 or above qualification.
  • The majority of the workforce has a NVQ Level 2 qualification (28%).
  • 13% of the workforce has no qualifications.
  • 53% of the workforce is employed full‐time.

[N.B. Data derived from Labour Force Survey, 2009.]

Jobs in the industry range from: kitchen assistants, bar manager, general manager, chef, cleaner, conference and banqueting manager, waiter/waitress, food and beverage manager, kitchen porter, restaurant manager, wine waiter.


National and regional data

East Midlands – There are approximately 45,200 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 45% work full‐time
  • 53% of the workforce is female
  • 70% of the workforce is white
  • 28% of the workforce is 16‐19 years
  • 31% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

East of England – There are approximately 47,300 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 50% work full‐time
  • 53% of the workforce is female
  • 81% of the workforce is white
  • The majority of the workforce is aged 16‐24 years (44%)
  • 31% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

London – There are approximately 92,900 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 64% work full‐time
  • 69% of the workforce is female
  • 39% of the workforce is white
  • 20% of the workforce is 20‐24 years
  • 30% of the workforce has an NVQ level 1 and entry level qualification

North East – There are approximately 25,300 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 46% work full‐time
  • 55% of the workforce is female
  • 80% of the workforce is white
  • The majority of the workforce is aged between 16‐24 years (48%)
  • 26% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

North West – There are approximately 65,500 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 53% work full‐time
  • 46% of the workforce is female
  • 79% of the workforce is white
  • The majority of the workforce is aged between 16‐24 years (47%)
  • 28% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

South East – There are approximately 76,500 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 61% work full‐time
  • 45% of the workforce is female
  • 73% of the workforce is white
  • 21% of the workforce is 16‐19 years
  • 26% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

South West – There are approximately 53,000 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 47% work full‐time
  • 56% of the workforce is female
  • 93% of the workforce is white
  • 36% of the workforce is 16‐19 years
  • 35% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

West Midlands – There are approximately 48,300 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 49% work full‐time
  • 42% of the workforce is female
  • 64% of the workforce is white
  • 22% of the workforce is 20‐24 years
  • 31% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are approximately 51,000 people working in the restaurant industry in this region, of which:

  • 43% work full‐time
  • 52% of the workforce is female
  • 79% of the workforce is white
  • 26% of the workforce is 16‐19 years
  • 31% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

Northern Ireland – There are approximately 43,900 people working in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector as whole in Northern Ireland, of which 20,800 work in the restaurant industry in 2,000 establishments. Details as follows:

  • 55% work full‐time
  • 57% of the workforce is female
  • 88% of the workforce is white
  • 34% of the workforce is 20‐29 years
  • 26% of the workforce has an NVQ level 2 qualification

Scotland – There are approximately 183,500 people working in the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector as whole in Scotland, of which 59,600 work in the restaurant industry in 6,200 establishments. Details as follows:

  • 51% work full‐time
  • 54% of the workforce is female
  • 88% of the workforce is white
  • 24% of the workforce is 24‐29 years
  • 27% of the workforce has an NVQ level 3 qualification

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