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leisure Centre Manager CV Writing Tip's

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leisure Centre Manager CV Writing Service

leisure Centre Manager CV Writing Service

The work

As a leisure centre manager, you would be responsible for the day-to-day running of a centre with leisure facilities like swimming pools, sports halls, outdoor facilities such as dry ski-runs, and facilities for the arts.

Your duties would vary depending on where you work, but would typically include:

  • arranging timetables for activities
  • organising and promoting special events
  • recruiting and managing staff
  • controlling budgets
  • taking responsibility for health and safety.

You may also visit external organisations, such as local authorities, to promote the facilities of the centre.


Hours

You would usually work 37 hours a week, which could include early mornings, evenings, weekends and bank holidays. You will need to be flexible, as you may need to be at the centre for special events, emergencies, or to cover for absent staff, especially in centres with a small management team.

You would be office-based, but would also spend time around the centre, talking to staff and customers, and keeping in touch with the way the centre is running.


Income

  • Managers can earn between £17,000 and around £25,000 a year
  • Senior managers can earn over £35,000.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

You can become a leisure centre manager in two ways:

  • completing a foundation degree, BTEC HND or degree before applying for management jobs, or
  • starting in an assistant position, or as a management trainee, and working towards professional qualifications.

Foundation degrees, BTEC HNDs and degrees are available in subjects such as:

  • sports and leisure management
  • leisure studies
  • sports science
  • recreation management.

Entry requirements for courses vary, so you should check with colleges or universities.

Gaining practical leisure centre experience, either paid or by volunteering, could increase your chances of employment.

If you have a degree you may be able to start as a graduate trainee with one of the large private sector employers. This would involve gaining the experience you need to become a leisure centre manager at the same time as completing professional qualifications.

You may also be able to get into the leisure industry through an Apprenticeship scheme. The range of Apprenticeships available in your area will depend on the local jobs market and the types of skills employers need from their workers.


Training and development

Once you are working in a leisure centre you could develop your career by completing one of the following qualifications:

  • Institute for the Management of Sport and Physical Activity (IMSPA) qualifications
  • NVQ Level 3 in Leisure Management
  • NVQ Level 4 in Managing Sport and Active Leisure
  • a foundation degree in a subject such as sport and recreation management, sport, health and fitness club management, and fitness and leisure management
  • a part-time degree in a subject such as sports and leisure management, leisure studies, sports science and recreation management.

Your employer may also offer in-house training.


Skills and knowledge

  • an interest in physical fitness and sport, although active ability is not essential
  • good spoken and written communication skills
  • customer service skills
  • administrative and management ability
  • skills in cash handling and working within budgets
  • IT skills
  • the ability to work in, and lead, a team
  • marketing and presentation skills.

Opportunities

You could find work with privately-owned leisure centre and health club chains, local authority centres, workplace clubs, hotels and outdoor activities centres.

You are likely to have more opportunities for promotion in larger companies – with experience you may be able to progress to area or regional manager, managing a group of centres. You may need to relocate for some senior jobs.

Alternatively, you could use your experience in leisure centre management to move into other areas such as sports development.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The sport and recreation industry is part of the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, represented by SkillsActive Sector Skills Council. This sector is based on leisure and recreation and includes: health and fitness; playwork; the outdoors; and the caravan industry. The UK active leisure, learning and well‐being sector currently employs 663,300 people, representing just over 2% of the UK workforce, and an estimated 1.9 million volunteers in England (equating to 54,000 full‐time equivalents). There are an estimated 39,800 workplaces, of which 74% employ 10 or less people. Much of the workforce work in a part‐time capacity (47%) and seasonal employment is important for outdoors, caravans and playwork, which attract students and other temporary workers.

The UK sport and recreation industry covers the full range of sports provision from grass roots community projects through to professional sports men and women at the peak of their performance. It also incorporates the day‐to‐day running of amateur and professional sports clubs, and the promotion of an active and healthy lifestyle. The structure of the industry is largely determined by the nature of provision; that is, whether its operators are publicly funded, private, not‐for‐profit, or charitable/voluntary organisations. Sport and recreation includes a variety of types of organisations, with a range of funding channels or support, ranging from commercial sports with large facilities to smaller sport clubs running on a charitable basis.

London’s successful bid to host the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games has put the UK’s sporting provision (both competitive and recreational) in the spotlight. The industry will play an essential role in ensuring that the delivery of the Games is effective and that the nation benefits from a lasting Olympic legacy.

Key facts:

  • There are 371,800 people working in the sport and recreation industry, together with a significant number of volunteers.
  • 41% of the workforce is employed full‐time, 48% part‐time and 11% self‐employed.
  • Around 32% of the workforce is aged 16‐24 year olds; this is higher than the 14% recorded across the UK workforce as a whole.
  • 25% of the adult population in England are members of club where they take part in sport (10 million people).
  • 17.5% of the adult population in England received tuition to improve their performance in sport during 2007/08.
  • Over 6 million adults participated in organised competitive sport in 20087/09.
  • There are over 1,177,000 regularly practicing coaches in the UK.

Jobs in the industry include: sports development officer, community sports development officer, club/coach development officer, activity team leader, professional athlete, sports physiotherapist, team doctor, strength and conditioning coach, coach educators, psychologist, biomechanist, masseur, dietician, nutritionist, coach, official (club, county, regional, national, international), recreation/leisure assistant, sports/leisure manager, events manager, volunteer co‐ordinator, groundskeepers, stewards.


National and regional data

East Midlands – There are 44,300 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 27,200 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region has a strong sports infrastructure. It hosts a number of world class facilities including: the National Ice Centre; the National Water Sports Centre; the National Cricket Academy; the Nottinghamshire Tennis Centre; golf courses, such as Belton Woods, and the National Golf Centre at Woodhall Spa; and racecourses at Nottingham, Leicester, Southwell, Market Rasen and Towcester, with Burleigh House hosting the annual International Horse Trials. There are also a range of professional sports club located in the region. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; first aid; and child protection.

East of England – There are 61,400 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 36,800 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region has a broad and exciting sporting heritage hosting a number of sporting and recreational facilities, including: football stadiums in Ipswich and Norwich; British horseracing headquarters; Snetterton racing circuit; Norfolk Broads; and Grafham Water sailing centre.

London – There are 70,200 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 45,200 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. London has a rich mix of active leisure and learning facilities, high profile sporting clubs and venues and hosts a wide range of international, national, regional and local events. The most important forthcoming sporting event for the region is the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, which is expected to bring a number of long term benefits to the region, including substantial investment and development in the sporting infrastructure in London. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; management; initiative; first aid; child protection; project management; and working with people with disabilities.

North East – There are 24,500 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 14,900 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region is home to a number of high profile sporting clubs including: Sunderland, Newcastle United and Middleborough football clubs; Durham County Cricket Team; Rugby Union Newcastle Falcons team; and the Newcastle Vipers ice hockey team. The North East has 20 facilities listed in the London 2012 Pre‐Games Training Camps Guide and 4 universities providing sports provision recognised in the 2012 Training Camps Guide. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; first aid; team‐working; health and safety; working with disabled people; child protection; and initiative.

North West – There are 65,700 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 38,300 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region has a rich sports infrastructure. It is home to: a number of professional football teams; a county cricket club and a test match venue in Lancashire; SuperLeague rugby clubs; a number of first class golf courses; the world’s biggest horse race (the Grand National at Aintree); and other race courses at Haydock, Chester, Carlisle and Cartmel. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; initiative; team‐working; planning and preparing work; child protection; and first aid.

South East – There are 96,700 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 62,300 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region hosts a range of high profile sporting venues and events, including: Eton Dorney; National Hockey Centre; Brands Hatch; and Cowes. A high percentage of English athletes funded under the world class programmes are based in the South East. Two of the nine UK Sports Institutes are based in the region at Bisham Abbey and Bisley. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; first aid; child protection; communication; management; and planning and preparing work.

South West – There are 53,700 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 28,100 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region is host to a number of high profile sporting events and venues including: Cheltenham Gold Cup; Badminton Horse Trials; European surfing at Newquay; sailing at Weymouth; and World Half Marathon in Bristol. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; management; team‐working; planning and preparing work; initiative; project management; and problem solving.

West Midlands – There are 48,200 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 28,600 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region hosts a range of high‐profile sporting venues, clubs and events, including: The National Indoor Arena (NIA) in Birmingham, which has staged over 40 major international sporting events since it opened in 1991; several football Premiership/Championship Clubs; high‐profile professional clubs in rugby and basketball; successful cricket, hockey and athletics clubs; the National Sports Centre at Lilleshall, which is part of the English Institute of Sport (EIS); the Belfry, a world‐class golf course; Warwickshire County Cricket Ground in Edgbaston; a regional indoor training centre at Worcester Rugby Club; and a number of racecourses. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; management; team‐working; initiative; and planning and preparing work.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are 51,900 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 29,900 are employed in the sport and recreation industry. The region has a strong sporting infrastructure and is home to a cluster of sports science, technology, medicine and economics research and development units. The region is home to a range of professional sports clubs and 11 venues feature in the London 2012 Pre‐Games Training Camp Guide. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; child protection; initiative; and management.

Northern Ireland – There are 10,738 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 8,100 are employed in the sport and recreation industry.

Scotland – There are 58,200 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 36,800 are employed in the sport and recreation industry.

Wales – There are 29,500 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 15,600 are employed in the sport and recreation industry.

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