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Mechanical Engineering Technician CV Writing Service

Mechanical Engineering Technician CV Writing Service

If you are good at maths and science, and you want a technical role in engineering, this job could be ideal for you.

Mechanical engineering technicians design, build, operate and service plant machinery and parts. They use various skills in their work, for instance welding and CNC machining.

In this job you would need to understand engineering drawings and principles. You would also need to be able to work methodically and accurately.

You could get into this job by studying a college course in mechanical engineering. Alternatively, you could train for this job through an Apprenticeship scheme.

The work

As a mechanical engineering technician, you could work in the following industries:

  • manufacturing – building engine and gear components, maintaining conveyor and packaging equipment, and servicing robotic machinery on production lines
  • power and processing – designing and making industrial plant equipment, such as valves and pumps for utility companies
  • building services – servicing lifts and escalators, and installing heating and air conditioning systems
  • transport – repairing mechanical parts on rail engines and signalling equipment.

Your duties could include:

  • drawing up plans for new ideas, using computer aided design (CAD) software
  • investigating and testing ideas to improve existing systems or to overcome machinery or process problems
  • making parts, and installing and testing instruments or machinery to make sure they run smoothly, safely and meet performance targets
  • carrying out preventative maintenance and identifying and repairing faults in equipment and machinery.

As an experienced technician, you might be responsible for production planning, purchasing, estimating, quality control, and supervising craftspeople.


Hours

Your working week would be around 37 to 40 hours, Monday to Friday. In factory production you are likely to work shifts and be on-call for out-of-hours problems.

Your workplace could range from a quiet office if carrying out CAD work, to a noisy factory production line if carrying out essential maintenance. Some of your work may be on outdoor sites.


Income

  • Starting salaries can be between £15,000 and £18,000 a year
  • Experienced technicians can earn between £18,500 and £30,000.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

You may be able to get into this career through an Apprenticeship scheme with an engineering, manufacturing or transport operating company. The range of Apprenticeships available in your area will depend on the local jobs market and the types of skills employers need from their workers.

To get on to an Apprenticeship, you may need four or five GCSEs (grades A-C) in subjects like maths, science, English, and design and technology. Some employers may ask for one or two A levels in maths and science or equivalent qualifications.

Alternatively, you could take a college course, which would teach you some of the skills needed. Relevant courses include:

  • BTEC National Certificate and Diploma in Mechanical Engineering
  • BTEC National Certificate and Diploma in Operations & Maintenance Engineering (Mechanical)
  • City & Guilds Certificate in Engineering (2800).

You should check with local colleges for their exact entry requirements.

For more information about engineering careers, see the websites for the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and SEMTA. The Engineering Training Council (Northern Ireland) has careers and course information for the area.


Training and development

You could take work-based NVQ qualifications, depending on your industry. These include:

  • Mechanical Manufacturing Engineering levels 2 and 3
  • Engineering Maintenance and Installation (Mechanical) Level 2
  • Engineering Maintenance (Mechanical) Level 3
  • Process Engineering Maintenance levels 2 and 3
  • Maintaining Plant and Systems (Mechanical) Level 3
  • Mechanical Engineering Services (options in Heating and Ventilation, Plumbing or Refrigeration and Air Conditioning) levels 2 and 3.

With a level 3 qualification, you could improve your career prospects by registering with the Engineering Council to gain EngTech status.


Skills and knowledge

To be a mechanical engineering technician you should have:

  • practical and technical skills
  • ability in maths, science and IT
  • good communication skills
  • an understanding of engineering drawings and principles
  • the ability to work methodically and precisely
  • the ability to manage a varied workload in an efficient manner
  • good problem-solving skills
  • teamworking skills.

Opportunities

Typical employers include local and central government, the armed services, manufacturers in all sectors and public utilities.

Your promotion options could include supervisory and management roles. You may also have the chance to specialise in a particular area of the job, such as computer aided design. With further training, you could eventually qualify as a mechanical engineer.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The automotive manufacturing industry is part of the engineering manufacturing, science and mathematics sector, represented by Semta Sector Skills Council. This sector also includes the following industries: electronics and electrical equipment manufacture; mechanical equipment manufacture; metals; transport equipment manufacture, including marine and aerospace; and science. Across the sector as a whole, the workforce comprises approximately 2 million people, working across around 75,000 companies. UK engineering and science turnover is over £250 billion. British engineering exports amount to 37% of total UK exports of goods and services. The UK is Europe’s top location for investment in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research and development.

The UK automotive manufacturing industry covers a range of companies involved in manufacturing of:

  • whole vehicles (such as cars, commercial vehicles, buses and coaches)
  • bodies (coachwork) for motor vehicles
  • engines and components (such as exhausts, wheels, gear boxes, safety belts and airbags).

It also includes companies involved in the manufacture of trailers, motor sport related vehicles, fire engines, buses, coaches, vans and lorries.

Key facts:

  • There are an estimated 154,400 people employed in the automotive manufacturing industry, across 3,220 workplaces in Great Britain.
  • The UK is a source of manufacturing sites for a number of well known international car manufacturers.
  • 96% of the workforce is full-time.
  • In engineering, an estimated 6% of the workforce is self-employed.

Jobs in the industry range from: manufacturing production manager, design engineer, electronics engineer, mechanical engineer, production engineer, quality control inspector, engineering maintenance technician, laboratory technician, engineering craft machinist, fitter, sheet metal worker, welder, assembler, motor vehicle manufacturing operative, labourers in process and plant operations.


National and regional data

The greatest concentrations of employment in the automotive industry within the UK are in the West Midlands and the North West of England.

East Midlands – There are an estimated 13,300 employees in the regional workforce, in around 340 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,400 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); assembly line/production robotics; and welding skills. 27% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Derby City, Leicester City, South Derbyshire, Charnwood, Hinckley and Bosworth and Ashfield.

East of England – There are an estimated 13,300 employees in the regional workforce, in around 380 companies. There is a total requirement of 3,880 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); CNC machine operation; and coach building. 27% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Peterborough, Huntingdonshire, South Cambridgeshire, Luton and Basildon.

London – There are an estimated 5,800 employees in the regional workforce, in around 160 companies. There is a total requirement of 1,130 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include general machining. 26% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Barking and Dagenham, Hillingdon, Ealing and Hounslow.

North East – There are an estimated 12,100 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 100 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,560 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Computer Aided Engineering (CAE); and welding skills. 49% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, Sunderland and Sedgefield.

North West – There are an estimated 18,100 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 370 companies. There is a total requirement of 5,020 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: general engineering skills; and coach building. 38% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Fylde, Knowsley, Crewe and Nantwich, Stockport, Oldham and Preston.

South East – There are an estimated 12,500 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 410 companies. There is a total requirement of 830 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation. 23% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around West Berkshire, Basingstoke and Deane, Milton Keynes, Eastleigh, Portsmouth, Crawley and Medway.

South West – There are an estimated 11,300 employees in the regional workforce, in just under 380 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,070 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: assembly line/ production robotics; craft skills; electronics; fabrication; mechanical fitters; and software engineering. 31% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Tewkesbury, Cheltenham, Stroud, South Gloucestershire, Bristol, Swindon, South Somerset, Poole and Plymouth.

West Midlands – There are an estimated 39,500 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 550 companies. There is a total requirement of 7,260 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: Materials Requirement Planning (MRP11); CNC machine operation; Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM); Computer Aided Engineering (CAE); tool setting; welding skills; and fabrication. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Birmingham, Sandwell, Walsall, Coventry, Dudley and Telford and Wrekin.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are an estimated 12,900 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 310 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,900 employees needed in the region between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps in the region include: CNC machine operation; craft skills; and multi-skills. 32% of the workforce is employed as vehicle body builders and repairers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Kirklees, Rotherham and Kingston upon Hull.

Northern Ireland – There are an estimated 3,400 employees in the regional workforce. There is a total requirement of 840 employees needed between 2005 and 2014. 46% of the workforce is employed as vehicle body builders and repairers. Skills gaps include: welding; CNC machine operations; mechanical engineering skills; metalworking; and electrical engineering skills.

Scotland – There are an estimated 3,600 employees in the regional workforce, in just over 110 companies. There is a total requirement of 260 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps include: tool setting; and manufacturing. 27% of the workforce is employed as vehicle body builders and repairers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around the City of Glasgow, Fife, South Lanarkshire, the City of Aberdeen, North Lanarkshire and West Lothian.

Wales – There are an estimated 12,100 employees in the regional workforce, in just under 190 companies. There is a total requirement of 2,610 employees needed between 2007 and 2014. Skills gaps include: Computer Aided Design (CAD). 32% of the workforce is employed as assemblers. Engineering employment is geographically concentrated around Flintshire, Neath Port Talbot, Newport, Rhondda, Cynon and Taff, Bridgend and Wrexham.

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