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Packer CV Writing Tip's

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Packer CV Writing Service

Packer CV Writing Service

If you are good with your hands, and you can work quickly and accurately, this job could be ideal for you.

Packers work on production lines, putting manufactured goods and products into containers like boxes, trays, bags and crates.

In this job you will need to have a fair level of physical fitness. You will also need to able to follow instructions and write clear labels.

To get into this job you don’t usually need qualifications, although you may need basic reading, writing and maths skills. For some jobs you might need a forklift truck licence. You might be able to get into this job through an Apprenticeship scheme, if they are run in your area.

The work

Some packers work by hand at a conveyor belt, while others operate packing machines and load the raw materials, packaging and labels.

Your duties would usually include:

  • packing goods with protective materials, such as bubble wrap and polystyrene chips
  • sealing containers using glue, staples or shrink-wrap
  • weighing and labelling packaged goods ready for dispatch
  • cleaning work areas
  • reporting any problems during the shift to supervisors.

In the case of heavy goods, such as washing machines or vehicle parts, you would use loading and lifting gear. You might also operate a forklift truck to move goods to storage areas.

You would follow health and safety regulations at all times, particularly when working with hazardous materials.


Hours

You would normally work between 35 and 42 hours a week. This could include shift work and may cover weekends or nights. Part-time work is common and there may be overtime.

You would be based in a factory or warehouse, and would spend most of your time sitting or standing at a packing machine or conveyor line. Some jobs, such as packing medicines, are done in sterile conditions. Meat packing would take place in a chilled environment.


Income

  • Starting salaries can be around £12,000 a year
  • Experienced staff can earn around £16,000 a year.

Salary rates vary considerably depending on the industry and your speed and experience. Some packers are paid piece rates. Salaries can increase with night shift payments, overtime and extra duties like driving.

Figures are intended as a guideline only.


Entry requirements

You do not usually need qualifications to work as a packer, although you may need basic reading, writing and maths skills. You may have to sit an entry test to assess your practical skills before being offered a job.

You may be able to start work as a packer through an Apprenticeship with a warehouse or manufacturing company. The range of Apprenticeships available in your area will depend on the local jobs market and the types of skills employers need from their workers.


Training and development

You would normally have a short induction period when you start work, covering health and safety, packing procedures and equipment, staff welfare and employment conditions. A supervisor or trainer would then show you how to carry out your duties.


Skills and knowledge

To be a packer you should have:

  • the ability to carry out repetitive tasks quickly and carefully
  • good practical skills
  • the ability to follow instructions
  • a reasonable level of fitness
  • clear handwriting for labelling
  • an awareness of safety issues.

Opportunities

Most of your opportunities are with factories and warehouses throughout the UK. Other organisations that employ packers include mail order companies, shipping and forwarding agents, large retailers, removals firms, and companies specialising in exporting goods.

Your promotion options include becoming a supervisor or shift leader. You could also move into the distribution and delivery of products, for example, as a Warehouse Manager.

Related industry information

Industry summary

The storage and warehousing industry is part of the logistics sector, represented by the Skills for Logistics Sector Skills Council, which also includes: air freight; wholesaling; road haulage; freight forwarding; postal services; and couriers. Logistics is the movement and supply of all goods (or freight) from raw materials, through all stages of the manufacturing process to the delivery of the finished product to companies and consumers. This is known as the ‘supply chain.’ Nearly 2,320,000 people work in the logistics sector, which accounts to 8% of the UK workforce. It has been estimated that the logistics sector is worth £86.54 billion to the UK economy.

Warehouses operate by storing all sorts of products and then dispatching them to where they are needed. A variety of goods are stored in warehouses, including: chemicals; electrical goods; textiles; and foodstuffs. To manage goods safely warehouses may need to be kept at, for example, a certain temperature or have refrigerated areas to keep food frozen.

Key facts:

  • A total of 190,600 people are employed in storage and warehousing in the UK, which is estimated to be 11% of the logistics sector workforce.
  • There are 5,600 storage and warehousing workplaces in the UK.
  • In England, the storage and warehousing industry employs a greater proportion of younger people than in any other part of the logistics sector.
  • 41% of the workforce is under 35 years old.
  • Self-employment in this industry is limited.

Jobs in the industry range from: warehouse assistant, warehouse manager, storekeeping, stores administration, forklift truck driver, warehouse team leader, order picker, stock controller.


National and regional data

East Midlands – Of the 156,600 employees working in logistics businesses in the region, 29,800 work in storage and warehousing. This equates to 19% of the logistics workforce in the East Midlands.

East of England – Of the 186,700 employees working in logistics in the East of England, 14,800 work in storage and warehousing. This equates to 8% of the logistics workforce in the region.

London – Of the 178,800 employees working in logistics businesses in London, 11,800 work in storage and warehousing. This equates to 7% of the logistics workforce in the city.

North East – Of the 55,000 employees working in logistics in the North East, 4,100 work in storage and warehousing. This equates to 7% of the logistics workforce in the region.

North West – Of the 193,400 employees working in logistics in the North East, 25,100 are employed in storage and warehousing roles. This equates to 13% of the logistics workforce in the region.

South East – Of the 256,300 employees working in logistics businesses in the region, 22,500 are employed in storage and warehousing roles. This equates to 9% of the logistics workforce in the region.

South West – Of the 135,100 employees working in logistics in the South West, 12,400 work in storage and warehousing. This accounts for 9% of the logistics workforce in the region.

West Midlands – Of the 187,500 employees working in logistics in the West Midlands, 29,300 are employed in storage and warehousing. This accounts for 16% of the logistics workforce in the region.

Yorkshire and the Humber – Of the 158,100 employees working in logistics in the region, 23,700 people are employed in storage and warehousing. This accounts for 15% of the logistics workforce in the region.

Northern Ireland – There is an estimated 80 workplaces involved in storage and warehousing.

Scotland – There is an estimated 7,600 employees in the industry, accounting for 7% of the logistics sector, in around 400 workplaces.

Wales – There is an estimated 4,500 employees in, accounting for 8% of the logistics sector, in around 200 workplaces.

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