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Sailing Instructor CV Writing Service

Sailing Instructor CV Writing Service

Sailing instructors teach people to sail yachts and boats, both at sea and on inland waterways like reservoirs, canals and lakes.

As a sailing instructor, you could teach one or all of the following:

  • dinghy sailing (small craft including keelboats and catamarans)
  • powerboat driving
  • windsurfing
  • yachting
  • cruising (large yachts and sailing vessels with crews).

Hours

As a sailing instructor employed by a sailing centre or club, your working hours will vary, often including weekend and evening work. If you are self-employed, you will work hours to suit client demand. Dinghy and windsurfing instruction tends to take place on a seasonal basis, although some sailing clubs and centres provide classes all year round.

You will teach practical skills on the water in most weather conditions. Yachtmaster and cruising instruction takes place at sea. You will also spend some time in a classroom, teaching theoretical knowledge and skills like navigation.

Income

  • Dinghy, powerboat and windsurfing instructors can earn from £12,000 to around £25,000 a year, depending on experience.
  • Yachtmaster instructors and cruising instructors can earn £60 to £90 a day.

 

Entry requirements

To become a sailing instructor you need to complete Royal Yachting Association (RYA) courses. The RYA is the national governing body (NGB) for sailing, and sets standards for training instructors.

You can complete a range of RYA instructor courses, depending on the type of sailing you want to teach. To begin the courses you must be at least 16, physically fit and able to swim, and a competent, experienced sailor of small boats.

If you do not already have experience of sailing you can attend training at all levels at RYA recognised schools and clubs. Visit the RYA website for full details.

Once you are competent and experienced, you can start your instructing career by training as an assistant instructor at a RYA training centre. As an assistant you will work under the supervision of a qualified instructor.

RYA instructor courses include:

Dinghy, Keelboat and Multihull Instructor
To do this you need:

  • a valid first aid certificate (either the RYA First Aid certificate or one recognised by the Health and Safety Executive, lasting at least six hours and covering the treatment of hypothermia)
  • a RYA Powerboat Level 2 Certificate
  • sailing ability and background knowledge assessed through the Instructor Pre-entry Assessment

Inland Waterways Helmsman Instructor
For this course you need:

  • extensive experience on UK inland waterways, preferably on a variety of craft
  • the RYA Inland Waterway Helmsman certificate
  • a valid first aid certificate
  • the Marine Radio Operators Short Range certificate or the old VHF Operators certificate.

Powerboat Instructor
For this you need:

  • at least five seasons’ experience, preferably on a wide range of craft (if you use powerboats as part of your full-time work this is reduced to one season)
  • a valid first aid qualification
  • Powerboat Level 2 certificate.

Windsurfing Instructor
For this course you need:

  • a RYA Level 3 Windsurfing Certificate
  • a first aid qualification
  • evidence of eight hours logged at an RYA centre.

Cruising Instructor
You will need:

  • Yachtmaster Offshore Certificate of Competence
  • first aid certificate
  • commercial endorsement
  • basic sea survival certificates
  • a medical fitness examination.

Yachtmaster Instructor
You will need to qualify as a cruising instructor before moving on to the yachtmaster instructor qualification.

Visit the RYA website for full information on all courses, including entry requirements and details of training centres.

Training and development

When you are qualified and experienced as an instructor, you can develop your career by choosing from a wide range of further RYA qualifications. Contact the RYA or visit their website for more details.

Skills and knowledge

  • competent sailing skills and sailing experience
  • a responsible attitude
  • the ability to give instructions and tuition clearly and concisely
  • good communication skills
  • awareness of health and safety
  • the ability to inspire respect and confidence
  • good organisation skills.

Opportunities

You could work as a dinghy instructor at sailing clubs or schools and local authority centres. It could increase your employability if you combine dinghy instruction with other outdoor activity instruction.

You could be employed as a yachtmaster or cruising instructor by sail and motor cruising centres. Alternatively, you could be self-employed, owning your own yacht and offering instruction through recognised centres.

With experience you could progress to a supervisory or management job within a sailing club.

Industry summary

The outdoors industry is part of the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, represented by SkillsActive Sector Skills Council. This sector is based on leisure and recreation and includes: sport and recreation; health and fitness; playwork; and the caravan industry. The UK active leisure, learning and well‐being sector currently employs 663,300 people, representing just over 2% of the UK workforce, and an estimated 1.9 million volunteers in England (equating to 54,000 full‐time equivalents). There are an estimated 39,800 workplaces, of which 74% employ 10 or less people. Much of the workforce work in a part‐time capacity (47%) and seasonal employment is important for outdoors, caravans and playwork, which attract students and other temporary workers.

The outdoors industry provides a diverse range of activities that span the spectrum of human activity, comprising education and recreation within the context of the outdoors. It is closely linked to the sport and recreation industry and playwork. The outdoor industry comprises:

  • Outdoor education – experiential, environmental, physical and social education
  • Outdoor recreation – organised and self‐guided outdoor activities for ‘fun’
  • Outdoor development training – leadership, team and management development
  • Outdoor sport development – performance coaching, instructor training and skill development
  • Expeditions and exploration – planning and delivery of local, national and international expeditions and research

Key facts:

  • There are 26,400 people working in the outdoors industry, together with a significant number of volunteers and seasonal posts.
  • There are an estimated 61,600 volunteers in the outdoors industry.
  • 45% of the workforce is employed full‐time, 41% part‐time and 15% self‐employed.

Jobs in the industry include: events manager, outdoor activities instructor, riding holiday centre manager, parks officer, outdoor centre manager.

National and regional data

East Midlands – There are 44,300 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 2,100 are employed in the outdoors industry. The region hosts many places to walk and cycle, and the growing network of rights of way, footpaths, multi‐use trails and long‐distance paths forms an important recreational resource. The Peak District offers climbing activities. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; first aid; and child protection.

East of England – There are 61,400 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 2,300 are employed in the outdoors industry. The region has diverse tourism, including coastlines, countryside locations, waterways, cycling and walking routes.

London – There are 70,200 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 3,100 are employed in the outdoors industry. London has a rich mix of active leisure and learning facilities. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; management; initiative; first aid; child protection; project management; and working with people with disabilities.

North East – There are 24,500 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 1,000 are employed in the outdoors industry. Opportunities for outdoor activities include: Kielder Water; Derwent Reservoir; the Northumberland coastline; the Coast 2 Coast (C2C) cycling route (part of the National Cycle Network); the Cleveland Way; the Hadrian’s Wall path; the Pennine Way; and Teesdale Way. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; first aid; team‐working; health and safety; working with disabled people; child protection; and initiative.

North West – There are 65,700 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 2,800 are employed in the outdoors industry. The region is home to the Lake District, Forest of Bowland and the coast, so facilities include a purpose built mountain bike trail and outdoor activity centres. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; initiative; team‐working; planning and preparing work; child protection; and first aid.

South East – There are 96,700 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 3,700 are employed in the outdoors industry. The region offers a wide range of natural resources, with the New Forest and South Downs and miles of coastline for outdoor activities. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical first aid; child protection; communication; management; and planning and preparing work.

South West – There are 53,700 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 3,100 are employed in the outdoors industry. The region offers a range of outdoor opportunities for surfing, sailing, surf lifesaving, Tarka Trail, Camel Trail and coastal paths. The region also has a growing reputation for Xtreme Sports. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; management; team‐working; planning and preparing work; initiative; project management; and problem solving.

West Midlands – There are 48,200 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 1,900 are employed in the outdoors industry. The National Exhibition Centre (NEC) at Birmingham hosts Leisure Industry Week, Outdoor Show, Caravanning Show and a number of national sporting events. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; management; team‐working; initiative; and planning and preparing work.

Yorkshire and the Humber – There are 51,900 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 2,000 are employed in the outdoors industry. The region has a strong sporting infrastructure and is home to a cluster of sports science, technology, medicine and economics research and development units. The region hosts three National Parks and a range of outdoors activities including rock climbing, airborne activities, water sports and cycling. Industry skills gaps in the region include: sport specific technical skills; communication; child protection; initiative; and management.

Northern Ireland – There are 10,738 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 500 are employed in the outdoors industry.

Scotland – There are 58,200 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 2,700 are employed in the outdoors industry.

Wales – There are 29,500 people employed in the active leisure, learning and well‐being sector, of which 1,400 are employed in the outdoors industry.

[N.B. Data derived from Annual Business Inquiry (GB), 2007, Northern Ireland, 2005 and Labour Force Survey (Annual average), 2008.]

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